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Cook In The Kitchen

Irish Jig modal

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#1 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 11:19 AM

When discussing modes this tune came to my mind, and had already been discussed to some extent there too - guess I once learned it from an early Dubliners recording, used to play it on the PA back then. Couldn't resist to give it a try with the EC;  a first-day-recording, which is thus still a bit rough, but to make it flow perfectly it might take me some more time than just a day or two added.
 
Anyway, should give the idea of my modal (or non-modal) understanding of this jolly tune...
 
Cook in the Kitchen
 
As always - any comments appreciated!
 
Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by blue eyed sailor, 17 March 2014 - 02:11 PM.


#2 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 04:38 AM

Being limited to being my own jugde due to the lack of comments this is what I've been able to make out of my arrangement in the course of the last days.

 

Cook in the Kitchen - intermediate

 

More consistent playing, renewed my jig-specific bellows technique (which I had already developed for the very first TOTM, one year ago...). Transitions between parts resp. repeats still to hasty, I know - find it quite sticky to improve on that feature... :)



#3 wes

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 03:14 PM

good effort! as you are looking for suggestions... i think it makes the tune more interesting to only use chords in specific areas to emphasize the tune and let the melody sing out. on the hastyness or uneven beat. a steady dancing beat is that is something that is a cornerstone of trad music, folk music in general the only exception i can think of is airs. its ok to spead up after a play thru but it has to be intentional and it does add excitement and drama, but again it has to be very steady and driving. keep practicing and have fun! p.s. thanks for your comment on my soundcloud spot, and i need to keep practicing too. when you start at a later age, its never easy.



#4 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:49 AM

Wes, thank you very much for commenting and suggesting...!
 
I totally agree with what you're saying regarding the steady beat. That's what we really appreciate when listening to the recordings of the pros..., and what we avocational players can just aim for. As already mentioned, I'm struggling amongst other things with not shortening the blanks between parts, or at the end of a line.
 
Regarding the chording I seem a bit to be sitting on a fence as I regard sort of a harmonic style as my personal approach to the EC on the one hand and am content with the results as yet. On the other hand I am definitely looking for a somewhat lighter touch and take your suggestion as confirmation and welcome advice in this matter. When playing airs or other slower, more elegic tunes I have already successfully alternated single line melody playing with accompanied runs. Since I don't believe that to be appropriate for this jig I have tried to alternate lesser and richer accompaniment and plan to include that in my next recording the tune.
 
As to your final remark, I noticed that we're quite of the same age. I've been playing piano over decades now, but the EC still is rather new to me (took it up some 2 1/2 years ago) so that I know in fact what you're talking about. Anyway, it took me some time to feel more or less at home on this very new and different instrument (what I already knew were PA and melodeon), but once this had been settled I've been increasingly enthusiastic for this great little, finally found, favourite instrument of mine and am now practising more then ever before (although of course depending on the amount of spare time available) to keep the momentum going...
 
Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by blue eyed sailor, 24 March 2014 - 06:18 PM.


#5 ceemonster

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:28 PM

i don't have any suggestions, just noting that the pukka "traditional" irish style would not be "harmonic" in the manner of this arrangement.  but if you're not going for that style, who cares? tune melodies can be interpreted in other styles, and  it's nice on its own terms...



#6 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:22 AM

Ceemonster, thank you very much as well for your feedback!

 

I'm very much aware that what I'm doing (and aiming for!) is not "ITM" in today's stricter sense, nor "Irish" concertina playing. As I always have the sound of the fiddle in mind (which should suit the EC-player well as to me), the added extra ("bass", uhm, lower notes) might be heard like the basic rhythm as to be provided by a piano (definitely not a grand then!).

 

Thus I would hope to play some Irish music in a wider sense. This will be true because of the melody, as mentioned by you, anyway.

 

But furthermore, there seems to have existed sort of a country-house tradition with fiddles and piano being the signature instruments (maybe like to be heard from some of those tracks ; I own three quite similar Topic titles which I'm not able to differentiate for now). I guess my objective regarding Irish dance music might be something along these lines...

 

Best wishes - Wolf







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