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Theme Of The Month, Dec 2013: Holiday Tunes!


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#19 JimLucas

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 01:22 PM

Interesting about the Gm. I've always played it in Am, which is the only key in which I've seen it published (EFDSS small books) and, if I remember correctly, the key used in the NY Revels the many years I was a member.

 
Ahh, yes. We had this conversation in your apartment when I visited Denmark in October.


Which I should have remembered, but when I replied I was rushing to pack for a 1000 km journey, and that meeting was outside my narrow focus. :o It was great to see you, though. :)

 

I learned it in G minor from Old Cecil, himself. Here's a page from his "Sword Dances of Northern EnglandSongs & Dance Airs Book II" (1912).

As far as I know, except for the scrap of paper Buckley had it scribbled down on, this is the tune's first appearance on paper. I think it is reasonable (but not certain) that Sharp notated it in G minor (1912) because Buckley notated it in G minor (1857) and that Buckley notated it in G minor because Robinson played it in G minor (1857) and that Robinson played it in G minor because the Horn Dance musicians of his youth played it in G minor (late 1700s).


Sounds reasonable to me. And it reminds me that back in those days (late 1700s) there was probably a much higher proportion of the people -- and not just "tutored" ones -- with accurate memories for absolute pitch.

#20 David Barnert

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 10:38 PM

 It was great to see you, though.  :)

Indeed. And hello from Marie Newman and Nancy Goody whom I saw this evening and mentioned our meeting. Neither is still Morris Dancing (nor married to the same people they were 25 years ago).

snapback.png

Interesting about the Gm. I've always played it in Am, which is the only key in which I've seen it published (EFDSS small books) and, if I remember correctly, the key used in the NY Revels the many years I was a member.

 


I learned it in G minor from Old Cecil, himself. Here's a page from his "Sword Dances of Northern EnglandSongs & Dance Airs Book II" (1912).

As far as I know, except for the scrap of paper Buckley had it scribbled down on, this is the tune's first appearance on paper. I think it is reasonable (but not certain) that Sharp notated it in G minor (1912) because Buckley notated it in G minor (1857) and that Buckley notated it in G minor because Robinson played it in G minor (1857) and that Robinson played it in G minor because the Horn Dance musicians of his youth played it in G minor (late 1700s).


Sounds reasonable to me...

 

Jim... Are you OK?  :ph34r:



#21 JimLucas

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 04:25 AM

Sounds reasonable to me...

 
Jim... Are you OK?  :ph34r:

Well, no. :o

But that's a physical infection I'm recovering from.


My mental capacity is the same as always.

(Do I hear some background mutterings of, "Then that's also a 'no'!"?) :ph34r:



#22 bellowbelle

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 12:29 AM

Tis Winter Now...

Attached File  TisWinterNowECgeordie.mp3   1.88MB   17 downloads

Just two verses. This is the tune, 'The Water Is Wide,' but the words in mind this time (didn't sing them) are the ones by Samuel Longfellow (brother of Henry, the famous poet).
http://www.cyberhymn.../i/tiswintr.htm

 

EDIT: 

A note....   I think this adaptation, using 'The Water Is Wide' (O Waly, Waly) is actually of my own doing...  I can't exactly remember!  Because the tune as given on the site about Samuel Longfellow's lyrics is not exactly that.  His words are set to 'Danby,' which is very similar.  If it's all one and the same, somehow, historically -- I'm sorry but I just don't know!  

 

I found this a few years ago, and I think I simply started using the folk song tune because it was similar.

 

Another edit:

Here's another site with the words, and a better recording of Danby (which I didn't use, apparently...). 


Edited by Wendy Stanford, 14 December 2013 - 10:18 AM.


#23 JimLucas

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 04:37 PM

Soon I hope to get around to doing something fresh, but for now here's another holiday track I did for my siblings in years past, this one in 2009.  It's really slower than I prefer for a joyful song, a bit long for just listening, and somewhat uneven in both balance and synchronization, but I think not too bad for doing 6 tracks in one afternoon on an old computer, in my living room, and without editing.  B)
 
When I learned this years ago, I was told it was traditional. Some quick research today tells me it was composed by Alix Herrmann, daughter of Lani Herrmann, who has been active in folk music on both coasts of America.  (Jim B., did you know her when she was in the DC area?)  And it's become a widespread standard, at least in where "folk" like to sing together.  :)
 

New Year's Round

 
Order of entry: low D whistle, tenor-treble English concertina (there's the relevance), high D whistle, my voice, my voice again.



#24 Jim Besser

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 05:53 PM

Soon I hope to get around to doing something fresh, but for now here's another holiday track I did for my siblings in years past, this one in 2009.  It's really slower than I prefer for a joyful song, a bit long for just listening, and somewhat uneven in both balance and synchronization, but I think not too bad for doing 6 tracks in one afternoon on an old computer, in my living room, and without editing.  B)
 
When I learned this years ago, I was told it was traditional. Some quick research today tells me it was composed by Alix Herrmann, daughter of Lani Herrmann, who has been active in folk music on both coasts of America.  (Jim B., did you know her when she was in the DC area?)  And it's become a widespread standard, at least in where "folk" like to sing together.  :)
 

New Year's Round

 
Order of entry: low D whistle, tenor-treble English concertina (there's the relevance), high D whistle, my voice, my voice again.

 

 

Nice.

 

Is Alix related to Joe?



#25 Robert Fisher

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 05:57 AM

I've just rattled off another Australian Christmas carol - The Silver Stars are in the Sky.

 

Merry Christmas and see you in the new year.



#26 JimLucas

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 01:18 PM

Will (wayman) started a new Topic to post this contribution, but it certainly fits here.
 

Don't miss it!  :)



#27 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 07:30 PM

Didn't find time to record my already announced contribution until 'twas Chrismas Eve. So here it is:

 

Fröhlich soll mein Herze springen (see other thread - will add link later on).

 

Merry Christmas to everyone!



#28 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 04:21 AM

Here's the related entry...



#29 JimLucas

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 12:29 PM

Will (wayman) started a new Topic to post this contribution, but it certainly fits here.
 

Don't miss it!  :)

 
And now there are two more holiday pieces that have been given their own threads instead of being added to this one.
 
Stille Nacht (Silent Night)
 
Auld Lang Syne

 

Come on, folks.  Give Jim B. a break and post your theme-related items here, so that we can tell that "Theme of the Month" is a useful concept (for this month, at least ;)).






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