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What sort of press for cutting valves?


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#1 Andy Holder

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 03:37 AM

Hi all. I've just had 3 cutting formes made for 6 sizes of leather valves, 2 per tool.

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I know there are several people here that do it so can I ask what sort of press is optimum for this and what is the best backing plate?

I was planning to use it upside down (blades up) so that it's easier to see where to place the material and therefore minimise waste.

There are some 500kg presses here, but I don't know if it would be man enough for the job.

Maybe something like this would be better, but I'm a bit stuck for space.

Any thoughts/experience?

Thanks, Andrew.

#2 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 05:42 AM

A big Hammer would be cheaper and takes up less space but with two valves per tool perhaps the hammer is not man enough. Unless you intend going into Valve production ,I would have thought that a simple Wad punch of the right shape, a hammer and a pair of ear protectors would do the job more quickly.
Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff, 24 April 2012 - 05:47 AM.


#3 Chris Ghent

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 08:09 AM

Andy, google "arbor press". Here is one result http://en.wikipedia....iki/Arbor_press

I use a plastic kitchen chopping board as a baseplate, one of the white soft ones. They have a fine raised pattern on them

You only would need a small one, mine is 1 or 1.5 tons and it will cut out a gusset with no effort and the line length of a gusset must be close to that of your two valves. It will cut 6 or 7 deep as well. You could take your cutter and a baseplate to the shop and try the different sizes of press. The advantage of a small one is it can be stored when not in use. You could cut out a years supply for the most prolific maker in the world in half a day with a single action tool. Finding the right leather, now thats time consuming.

Anyone wanting tools to cut out valves or bellows parts, look for a person who makes clicker cutters for the shoe trade. Shoes are a bunch of leather shapes sewn/glued together, and the people who make the cutters are part of an industry that is centuries old. Mine cost about AUD$18 each. They work like a wadding punch and are really just a ring of sharp edged steel with a handle attached, which I hit with a hammer. Here is the outfit that made mine.
http://lucris.com.au...ew&id=20

Edited by Chris Ghent, 24 April 2012 - 08:33 PM.


#4 Andy Holder

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:01 AM

A big Hammer would be cheaper and takes up less space but with two valves per tool perhaps the hammer is not man enough. Unless you intend going into Valve production ,I would have thought that a simple Wad punch of the right shape, a hammer and a pair of ear protectors would do the job more quickly.
Geoff.


Geoff, I'm planning to use them one at a time, because they have spaced the two cutters rather too much and there would be a lot of waste. It does work with a hammer but I think the life of the tool will be reduced that way. I've got 3 ECs 3 Acs and a Duet to do so that's the best part of 500 valves needed. Worth the cost of a cheap press.

Andy

#5 Andy Holder

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:09 AM

Andy, google "arbor press". Here is one result http://en.wikipedia....iki/Arbor_press

I use a plastic kitchen chopping board as a baseplate, one of the white soft ones. They have a fine raised pattern on them

You only would need a small one, mine is 1 or 1.5 tons and it will cut out a gusset with no effort and the line length of a gusset must be close to that of your two valves. It will cut 6 or 7 deep as well. You could take your cutter and a baseplate to the shop and try the different sizes of press. The advantage of a small one is it can be stored when not in use. You could cut out a years supply for the most prolific maker in the world in half a day with a single action tool. Finding the right leather, now thats time consuming.

Anyone wanting tools to cut out valves or bellows parts, look for a person who makes clicker cutters for the shoe trade. Shoes are a bunch of leather shapes sewn/glued together, and the people who make the cutters are part of an industry that is centuries old. Mine cost about AUD$18 each. They work like a wadding punch and are really just a ring of sharp edged steel with a handle attached, which I hit with a hammer. Here is the outfit that made mine.
http://lucris.com.au...ew&id=20


Thanks Chris.
There are quite a few on ebay, I'll go for one of those. The reason I was worried was because I tried it on my very big floor standing pillar drill and it didn't cut all the way round, nor did it work with a circular punch. I guess the platen just isn't quite solid enough. Those cutters cost me around 40 each. I thought I'd save time by cutting two in one go but they have not put them close enough together so it'll waste too much material and, as you say, it's finding the good leather that takes the time. Luckily I have a supplier of hair sheep leather down the road so I can go and browse.
Andy

#6 Leo

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 01:44 PM

Hi Andy

I've used lots of hole punches of the hammer and anvil type for various projects. Some of them up to an inch in diameter were my grandfathers, and I'm over 60. I've never resharpened them. When I was young I was taught to use the end grain of a piece of wood, like a 2x4 as the anvil so the punch cuts completely through the material, and mostly closes up for the next hole. Definitely something that won't damage or dull the punch.Works for me.

Thanks
Leo

Edited by Leo, 25 April 2012 - 01:45 PM.


#7 Andy Holder

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 04:45 AM

Hi Andy

I've used lots of hole punches of the hammer and anvil type for various projects. Some of them up to an inch in diameter were my grandfathers, and I'm over 60. I've never resharpened them. When I was young I was taught to use the end grain of a piece of wood, like a 2x4 as the anvil so the punch cuts completely through the material, and mostly closes up for the next hole. Definitely something that won't damage or dull the punch.Works for me.

Thanks
Leo



Thanks Leo. I think I have a piece of maple with tight grain, I could use a slice of that.
Andy




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