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Wanted: old German concertina.


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#1 Dan A

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 11:53 PM

Anybody have a double-reeded, two-row German as would have been common in Ireland around the turn of the 20th century, still making sound? I emailed Chris Algar if he had any but he said the cost of restoration generally isn't worth it as a business thing, so he doesn't pick them up. Figured out there somebody's got to have one though.

--Dan

#2 Greg Jowaisas

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 12:12 AM

Probably not double reeded but perhaps worth a look:

http://www.ebay.com/...=item3a707546be

Certainly of the period.

Greg

#3 richard

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 11:09 AM

Hi Dan

I have had a number of Scholer brand concertinas and I think most of them are double reeded. They can be a lot of fun. finding one in C/G can be challenging but there are a lot of them out there and if you are patient you could probably find one in a particular key. These weren't around at the turn of the century but I believe they were used later on. John Williams uses one in his instructional video.

Richard

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  • scholer.jpg


#4 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 12:41 PM

Probably not double reeded but perhaps worth a look:

http://www.ebay.com/...=item3a707546be

Certainly of the period.


I agree - probably not double-reeded.

There are two distinct types of old German concertina. This one is what I would call a "German Anglo", i.e. one made in Germany to resemble an English Anglo. The other type is a true "German" concertina in hexagonal form - what is known in German language forums today as a "deutsche Konzertina". Both have 20 buttons

The outward distinguishing feature is the orientation of the button rows. The "German concertina" proper has the rows parallel to two of the straight sides, whereas the one on eBay has the rows at right angles to the straight sides, like an English-made Anglo-German. Put another way, in normal seated playing position, the English version rests with a flat side on your knee, the German with a corner.

Funny enough, the concertina that I started out with was a German one that I bought new in Belfast in the 1960s. It was accordion-reeded, with double reeds in reed banks. This would be just the thing you're looking for! I attach a photo of the same model, the Rosetti Rambler (a rather decrepit example) I downloaded from eBay. Note the orientation of the button rows and the typically German "fretwork": a number of round holes arranged to form rosettes. My c. 1900 German Bandoneon has similar sound-holes.

German Conc Rosetti Rambler.jpg

Cheers,
John

#5 Dan A

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 06:31 PM

Interesting...so when we say older Irish players played German concertinas, which of those two varieties do we generally mean? I think I've seen pictures of both in the hands of some hoppity old ladies. I have seen both varieties on ebay as well, but hadn't quite figured the big quare square ones - Chemintzers?

They're all lovely beasties in their own right.

--Dan

#6 BlueJack

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:55 AM

[quote name='richard' timestamp='1329149368' post='133140']
Hi Dan

I have had a number of Scholer brand concertinas and I think most of them are double reeded. They can be a lot of fun. finding one in C/G can be challenging but there are a lot of them out there and if you are patient you could probably find one in a particular key. These weren't around at the turn of the century but I believe they were used later on. John Williams uses one in his instructional video.

Richard

I have one of the Scholers. My wife gave it to me in 1976. It's CG ad still works just fine. It is double reeded except one bank on the left side has three reeds. Big sound and an octave lower than my Wheatstone anglo. Not for sale, though.

BlueJack

#7 Dan A

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:36 AM

Double/triple reeded AND a baritone? Whoa. I can only hope I chance across something that awesome.




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