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Dirge request - how about a version of this please?


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#1 Kautilya

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 08:12 PM

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=L0j2CeNW_Ig
:rolleyes: :rolleyes:
it is Irish, may be traditional, old, modern: in fact everyone seems to have had a finger in this pie............look it up on wikipedia

There is a Beethoven variation but cannot access scorer to see if a score
http://www.unheardbe...ce=op105-04.mp3

btw anyone tried using this toon finder?

http://www.musipedia.org/

Edited by Kautilya, 30 January 2012 - 08:31 PM.


#2 cboody

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 02:34 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0j2CeNW_Ig
:rolleyes: :rolleyes:
it is Irish, may be traditional, old, modern: in fact everyone seems to have had a finger in this pie............look it up on wikipedia


Wikipedia url is

http://en.wikipedia...._Rose_of_Summer

It ends up being called Irish, I think, mostly because of the text source even though the melody is ascribed to an Irish composer. The musical style is generally out of vogue now since we seem to have lost the ability to sing and play sentimental pieces without getting involved of with the musical excesses that the Riu version is full of. That version suffers from the same problems as "Celtic Women" and the later dance shows of Michael Flatley.

#3 Dirge

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:00 AM

Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.

#4 Irene S.

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:57 AM

Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".

#5 JimLucas

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 08:11 AM

It ends up being called Irish, I think, mostly because of the text source even though the melody is ascribed to an Irish composer.

The words to The Last Rose of Summer are by Thomas Moore (1779-1853), who identifies the tune as "The Groves of Blarney", presumably an earlier song to the same tune.

In the book Folk Song Settings by Master Composers by Herbert Haufrecht is an excerpt from the Mendelssohn arrangement mentioned in the Wikipedia article. The same book has several Beethoven arrangements of songs from the British Isles -- including Moore's The Minstrel Boy (tune: "The Moreen"), -- but doesn't include Beethoven's arrangement of The Last Rose....

Somewhere I have the words to a parody of The Last Rose of Summer, titled The Last Piece of Pudding. ;)

#6 Dirge

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 02:09 PM


Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".


It's not very exciting Irene. [attachment=7255:lastrose.mp3] more or less as writ but I only saw your post 20 mins ago so don't expect much. You could play it on yours probably, it doesn't need much range. I started tinkering arround it and came up with what I thought sounded better fairly easily, but if you don't mind K I'd rather not. Londonderry Air I like; this is a bridge too far.

#7 Kautilya

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 05:28 PM



Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".


It's not very exciting Irene. [attachment=7255:lastrose.mp3] more or less as writ but I only saw your post 20 mins ago so don't expect much. You could play it on yours probably, it doesn't need much range. I started tinkering arround it and came up with what I thought sounded better fairly easily, but if you don't mind K I'd rather not. Londonderry Air I like; this is a bridge too far.

Very nice, and not only that: I have not heard anyone, ever, give such depth to that trill ( very difficult on the harmonica even) half way through - your slowing it down, and pausing slightly before you climb back up, works not just well, but munificently!As Beethoven would have said, 'wunderbar'!

Even Joan Sutherland did not handle the trill as well as you....
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=OP2Oq12X77g
Nor you compatriote Kiri
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=GbfpDDf3ZPw

I don't believe there is a Ferrier recording.

There is similar potential for that skill perhaps in this post 18 months ago (Rosamunda particularly - your box lends itself (and your fingerwiggies) really well to this slow material.
http://www.concertin...pic=11586&st=36

Edited by Kautilya, 31 January 2012 - 06:56 PM.


#8 Dirge

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:04 PM




Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".


It's not very exciting Irene. [attachment=7255:lastrose.mp3] more or less as writ but I only saw your post 20 mins ago so don't expect much. You could play it on yours probably, it doesn't need much range. I started tinkering arround it and came up with what I thought sounded better fairly easily, but if you don't mind K I'd rather not. Londonderry Air I like; this is a bridge too far.

Very nice, and not only that: I have not heard anyone, ever, give such depth to that trill ( very difficult on the harmonica even) half way through - your slowing it down, and pausing slightly before you climb back up, works not just well, but munificently!As Beethoven would have said, 'wunderbar'!

Even Joan Sutherland did not handle the trill as well as you....
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=OP2Oq12X77g
Nor you compatriote Kiri
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=GbfpDDf3ZPw

I don't believe there is a Ferrier recording.

There is similar potential for that skill perhaps in this post 18 months ago (Rosamunda particularly - your box lends itself (and your fingerwiggies) really well to this slow material.
http://www.concertin...pic=11586&st=36

Blimey. Thank you.

#9 Kautilya

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:47 PM





Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".


It's not very exciting Irene. [attachment=7255:lastrose.mp3] more or less as writ but I only saw your post 20 mins ago so don't expect much. You could play it on yours probably, it doesn't need much range. I started tinkering arround it and came up with what I thought sounded better fairly easily, but if you don't mind K I'd rather not. Londonderry Air I like; this is a bridge too far.

Very nice, and not only that: I have not heard anyone, ever, give such depth to that trill ( very difficult on the harmonica even) half way through - your slowing it down, and pausing slightly before you climb back up, works not just well, but munificently!As Beethoven would have said, 'wunderbar'!

Even Joan Sutherland did not handle the trill as well as you....
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=OP2Oq12X77g
Nor you compatriote Kiri
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=GbfpDDf3ZPw

I don't believe there is a Ferrier recording.

There is similar potential for that skill perhaps in this post 18 months ago (Rosamunda particularly - your box lends itself (and your fingerwiggies) really well to this slow material.
http://www.concertin...pic=11586&st=36

Blimey. Thank you.

Don;t thank me! Pat yourself on the pate and make sure you don't delete that recording.
I know you hate the hobbits and Orc that goes with them but it is the pauses, particularly in the second part, in Concerning Hobbits which make great playing out of a simply great melody with so much meaning in it.
Notice the (Irish!)meister switches flute for pipe

http://www.encyclope...plays-lord.aspx

#10 Kautilya

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 07:58 PM


http://www.youtube.c...h?v=L0j2CeNW_Ig
:rolleyes: :rolleyes:
it is Irish, may be traditional, old, modern: in fact everyone seems to have had a finger in this pie............look it up on wikipedia


Wikipedia url is

http://en.wikipedia...._Rose_of_Summer

It ends up being called Irish, I think, mostly because of the text source even though the melody is ascribed to an Irish composer. The musical style is generally out of vogue now since we seem to have lost the ability to sing and play sentimental pieces without getting involved of with the musical excesses that the Riu version is full of. That version suffers from the same problems as "Celtic Women" and the later dance shows of Michael Flatley.

We can differe on Rieu (that is a great whistle player - talk about bellows control!) And I deliberately avoided Celtic Woman - I totally agree with you it is rather ugh!.

As for Flatley and the stiff, paroissal, upper body (it goes as far back as a cine film visual which I am familiar with of my cousin Irish dancing at a public peformance back in 1951! She and the others girls were all monitored/watched closely by nuns,clergy and Xtian Brothers...keep those hemlines down! :ph34r:

Edited by Kautilya, 31 January 2012 - 07:59 PM.


#11 cboody

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 11:02 PM

Check out

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=fF1LQn94_Sc

Much quicker and a lovely turn (it really isn't a trill.. :D

#12 Irene S.

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 07:13 AM



Had a quick look; couldn't find any music (amazingly) so I'll pass, thank you.

It struck me that you could combine this and Londonderry air into one piece, playing both at the ame time, and it might sound quite nice.


Sheet music easily found (free PDF download) here http://www.free-scor...ic.php?pdf=9298

This arrangement was the work of Friedrich von Flotow (good old Irish name that!!) A well-known Victorian operatic composer (at the time well-known, that is) of the German persuasion
http://en.wikipedia....rich_von_Flotow
He used it in his opera "Martha".


It's not very exciting Irene. [attachment=7255:lastrose.mp3] more or less as writ but I only saw your post 20 mins ago so don't expect much. You could play it on yours probably, it doesn't need much range. I started tinkering arround it and came up with what I thought sounded better fairly easily, but if you don't mind K I'd rather not. Londonderry Air I like; this is a bridge too far.


I wouldn't disagree with you that it wasn't very exciting David! I never said it was (LOL) Merely responding to your comment that you couldn't find an arrangement anywhere on line ;) (The heading to the arrangement , by the way, does,indicate that it's a piano piece for beginners - - and you certainly ain't that, from all the conversations we have had in the past! )

I haven't tried playing it personally, as I can't get at a tina at the moment, thanks to recuperating from the operation side of things (which don't allow me to bend down to pick things up, and also means that I have a certain degree of discomfort which makes me resistant to the idea of trying anything llike that.) . I have enough fun currently trying not to drop my crutches - or anything else -and life is rather taken up with eating, exercising, resting, walking a bit, and not much else. (Not even my singing :( )

As a result I had to be content with sight reading, which indicated that it was going to be a bit routine and uninteresting, and just one tiny step up above a basic oom pah pah accompaniment . (Dull) . I think if I was having a go at it myself (even with my relatively inexperienced hands ) I'd be inclined to start experimenting using the base line as a springboard.

As to Kautilya's comments that you've slowed it down - really ?? That surprises me. The speed is more or less what I would have expected from my memories of hearing it sung in the past, and from the word contents of the song which are somewhat sombre . It's not really a song for speedy or jaunty delivery - see below
"The Last Rose Of Summer"

'Tis the last rose of summer left blooming alone
All her lovely companions are faded and gone
No flower of her kindred, no rosebud is nigh
To reflect back her blushes and give sigh for sigh

I'll not leave thee, thou lone one, to pine on the stem
Since the lovely are sleeping, go sleep thou with them
Thus kindly I scatter thy leaves o'er the bed
Where thy mates of the garden lie scentless and dead

So soon may I follow when friendships decay
And from love's shining circle the gems drop away
When true hearts lie withered and fond ones are flown
Oh who would inhabit this bleak world alone?
This bleak world alone

Edit: When I made the comment above, I hadn't actually listened to the Youtube clip that Kautilya had put up. I have now listened to Mr Rieu's orchestral arrangement, and must admit that I thought that that version dragged rather a lot. (It wasn't really helped by the use of the flageolet. The tune is a rather lush one as normally presented, and that gave it a rather weedy sound ... but then, that 's a personal opinion, I suppose)

Another version of Flotow's arrangement of the piece, sung here by Renee Fleming ... which I must admit I vastly prefer to those by Joan Sutherland and Dame Kiri .... much more fluid.

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

Having listened to all three of these vocal versions I must admit that they are all a tad slower than yours IMHO B)

(I forgot to say thanks for your rendition which satisfied curiosity)

Edited by Irene S, 01 February 2012 - 07:27 AM.


#13 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 08:11 AM

Interesting to hear all the more or less elaborate arrangements!
Dirge, I never cease to wonder how people can play harmonised tunes at sight like that!

Re the discussion topic on "The Tradition" , The Last Rose of Summer is a traditional song for me. I know the poet is known, but I knew the song long before I knew there was a Thomas Moore. It's the kind of song that makes me pick up my banjo, guitar or Crane and just sing it.

OK, if I were to perform it in public, I'd have to polish up those grace-notes (which in my song-book are a bit more than just a turn).

Its a lovely lyric, typical of Moore, whom I call the Poet of Friendship. This song always makes me think of my 93-year-old mother-in-law, whose early photos show a really pretty young woman: "'Tis the last rose of summer, left blooming alone; all her lovely companions are faded and gone." (Suits her better than the epithet "last of the Mohicans" B) )

Cheers,
John

#14 Dirge

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 05:19 PM

Interesting to hear all the more or less elaborate arrangements!
Dirge, I never cease to wonder how people can play harmonised tunes at sight like that!


Cheers,
John


Lots of practice, matey, as well you know! But this one is very simple; as Irene says it's a rank beginner's piano piece. Print it off, get the Crane out and have a go (Then rewrite the bass line...)

It's not my favourite tune. I don't mind a bit of Victorian kitsch once in a while but I was cursing Kautilya half the day yesterday for getting the damned thing stuck in my head.

On the other hand for the other half of the day I was concerned whether Eurydice was troubled or not. I like that one so he regained a bit of ground.

#15 Kautilya

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 06:27 PM

As to Kautilya's comments that you've slowed it down - really ?? That surprises me. The speed is more or less what I would have expected from my memories of hearing it sung in the past, and from the word contents of the song which are somewhat sombre . It's not really a song for speedy or jaunty delivery - see below

I think you need to maximise your crutches activity by working up some double-floor-tapping percussion! There was actually a spoons & bones tutor at Waddow Folkus this weekend (beginners and intermediate!!)

On the speed front I was trying to say something else I suppose.

There is no way it should be sung as fast as Charlotte did it (she was younger then!).
I always sing it slow...and as you say, the lyrics show the pace, just as Dirge played it.
The great thing he did additionnaly was the way he handled that rising element (trill or whatever you want to call it!) -- I was talking about the pause he used - which neither Kiri nor Joan did. It wasn't whether they were singing faster or slower than Dirge's playing - it was Dirge's suspended suspense which was so goof! Try listening to the difference again maybe? :)

In fact we discussed precisely this at Waddow on Saturday with reference to some other toons and The Last Rose. It just shows how one individual can bring something quite new to a melody which has been played and sung millions of times for a hundred years and more. :)




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