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McCann, Macann, or Maccann?


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#145 Rod

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 02:27 PM

' Trimming ' . Have been wondering what this word might have implied. Perhaps playing brief excerpts of popular tunes compounded into a continuous uninterrupted medley which could have been terminated at short notice as circumstances demanded. Music by the yard ! In my young days quite a lot of light music was broadcast in this manner over the radio. The pianist Charlie Kunz was just one of the masters of that style . ( I expect someone will know the true explanation. )

#146 JimR

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 03:35 PM

At football grounds we have personalities.  There’s the concertina expert and the purveyor of gingerbread from a tray that is tasteful and tricky in that its light gets the eye of everyone – the greatest gift in advertising.
To my admittedly American eyes, this quote talks about two different people, the concertina expert and the gingerbread seller.

#147 JimLucas

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 03:46 AM

' Trimming ' . Have been wondering what this word might have implied.

 

Hmm.  "Trimming" has (at least) two distinct meanings, and it's the other one that I assumed when I first read that, i.e., "decorating".



#148 Myrtle's cook

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 06:57 AM

Crane Driver wrote: Does the Liverpool Echo still have records of who wrote "Bee's Sports Notes" back in 1915?  It would be wonderful if an archive of his notes survived, but I'm not holding my breath.  A job for Myrtle's Cook, perhaps?
[/quote]

I'm onto it (but awaiting a reply to my call)! I have read back through a number of other 'Bee's Sports Notes' and they are often written in the same slightly exuberant and florid language. They provide quite a contrast to the detailed match reports. 'Bee' is often opinionated and sometimes there is a feeling of an 'in joke' being shared with his readership which is now quite lost on the contemporary reader. It has crossed my mind that JHM may have become in some way troublesome to Liverpool FC and its crowds, and perhaps, after several informal warnings, a witty sports journalist was asked to write a piece to help ensure he stayed away from the ground in future.

Edited by Myrtle's cook, 22 June 2015 - 06:58 AM.


#149 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 09:13 AM

I suppose, assuming the 'obit' is genuine, that the Prof may have died elsewhere, perhaps on a holiday to the Isle of Man or Ireland, but most of the newspapers from there are available on line and I can't find him there either. 

 

Mind you, my experience of such things is that the deaths of "ordinary" people (including forgotten music-hall artists) didn't generally start to get reported/advertised in newspapers until after the First World War, and gradually more so in the following years.


Edited by Stephen Chambers, 22 June 2015 - 09:14 AM.


#150 Myrtle's cook

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 11:26 AM

THE DEATH OF MINNIE MACCANN

In searching for a burial record for JHM amongst the burial registers and parish records of Liverpool I have also kept an eye open for additional details for these two parties.

Burial of Minnie MacCann
West Derby Cemetery
Burial no. 28175
March 4th 1908
Aged 47 years
Residence: Mill Road Infirmary
Rank or profession: ‘---‘ [just a line]
District of Everton
Mode of burial: single
Location: Section 2: grave 1793
Ceremony by Rev N H Harpur
(Liverpool Libraries reference: 283 West Derby 10/1/5)

Comments:
- West Derby Cemetery is one of a number of large municipal cemeteries laid out on the edge of the city of Liverpool in the 19th century as the city’s population began to exponentially increase.
- Mill Road Infirmary was part of the West Derby Union which oversaw the work houses and public hospitals until 1929 when the Local Government Act transferred these responsibilities to local authorities.
- Her grave is in a Church of England section and was a ‘free ground’ burials (as distinct from burials where the plot had been purchased). I visited the site on Saturday and located her plot, which is unmarked and sits between a number of other unmarked graves. A rather forlorn end for Minnie. I am not so sure she would be pleased to know that another concertina player was taking an interest in her(?)
- The Rev Harpur seems to have presided over the great majority of Anglican burials at this cemetery.

THE WEDDING OF JHM AND SARAH JANE KENNERLEY (much of this information is available on line and will have been seen by Crane Driver and others already)
The banns were read on 5th, 12th and 19th of April by Rev Cuffe, the incumbent of St Stephens (where they were to be married).
The Banns Record records John Henry McCann (widower) and Sarah Jane Kennerley (s)
Wedding 11:30 April 22nd. Note that it is John HENRY in the Banns.
(Liverpool Libraries ref: 283/GRO/3/3)

The Marriage records both JHM and Sarah as resident at 3 Minshull Str at the time of marriage.
The ceremony was not performed by the vicar of St Stephens who had read the banns (Rev Cuffe) but instead by Rev H R Parnell of St Marys, Edge Hill.
The record states that Sarah’s father was Thomas Kennerley, boiler maker (deceased). It also has the correction of Henry to Hillam for JHM mentioned previously in this discussion thread.
The witnesses are William Noble and Sarah Love.
(Liverpool libraries ref: 283/GRO/5/3)

Comments:
-The correction of JHM’s middle name on the marriage record would seem to be that of an error carried over from the banns.
- St Stephen’s was the closest Church of England church to Minshull Str (probably about 2 or 3 minute’s walk); St Mary’s, Edge Hill is only a fraction further away. ( see http://www.liverpool...erpoolaz/R7.htmtiles P7, R7, P6)
St Stephens seems to have been an unusually quiet church in terms of weddings, with only 9 in 1908, whilst there were 47 in the nearby St Marys, Edge Hill. Within the parish records for both churches there is no reason given for Rev Parnell presiding over ceremonies in place of Rev Cuffe (the Rev Cuffe presides over the Easter service the preceding Sunday and is back in the pulpit the Sunday following the wedding). Of the 9 weddings performed in 1908 Rev Cuffe presides over six, with Rev Parnell presiding over two others and another vicar the ninth. The various parish minute books etc of the period record a declining congregation and a church operating on a constant deficit.

Neither JHM or Sarah are listed amongst the Communicants of St Stephens in the earliest surviving register covering 1913-43 (Liverpool Library Reference 283 GRO/8/1), so this would seem to be a quiet church of convenience rather than the church to which they belonged (although accepting that much can happen over five years).

Turning to the witnesses, William Noble and the improbably named witness for a wedding ‘Sarah Love’. I did wonder if they might have been serial or ’professional’ witnesses, but their names do not appear as witnesses to any other weddings taking place in either St Stephens and St Mary’s in 1908.

On closer investigation it is most likely that this William Noble is a resident of the nearby and affluent Faulkner Square (no. 33) and whilst not a member of St Stephen’s congregation (he’s not in the in 1913 Communicants Register) he financially contributed to this church. In the various censuses, directories etc he is listed as a retired officer of private means (b.1839) and a former treasurer of the city’s harbour board (a position of some importance). How he might have come to know JHM (or Sarah) we can only guess – perhaps a pupil?

Following the speculation above concerning JHM’s relationship with alcohol in later life, I cannot resist raising the very outside possibility that the witnessing William Noble may have been an Evangelical preacher of that name spearheading a the ‘Blue Ribbon [temperance] Movement’ that was doing the rounds of English meeting halls and mission chapels at the time. Had JHM become a convert in his battle with the drink and perhaps provided William Noble with a sound track to his lectures and preaching? JHM records in an interview that he enjoyed playing spiritual music at services on long sea passages (http://www.concertin.../images/P08.htm). For the avoidance of doubt this suggestion is made with tongue firmly in cheek!

Turning to Sarah Love. We do not find her listed amongst St Stephen’s communicants in the churche’s 1913-43 Register so might assume her to be a friend of Sarah or JHM. There are a number of possibilities listed in the 1901 and 1911 censuses, amongst them: A Sarah Jane Love, aged 35 in 1911, a housekeeper in nearby 5 prospect Vale; Sarah Love, aged 48 in 1901 and resident in nearby 29 Sidney Place (apparently a housewife); Sarah Love, aged 23, Chandlers Assistant and head of household, resident at nearby Low Hill. If she were any of these three, then it implies that Sarah Kennerley is of a similar rather modest background.

The day of the wedding was a Wednesday, not unprecedented, although the local norm of the time would seem to have been Saturdays going from the parish registers. Perhaps earnings from a Saturday’s engagements were too important to be sacrificed for a musician – whether busking to football crowds or playing in pubs (and it might be noted that a significant number of pubs in the Liverpool city centre and outlying boroughs had concert rooms attached and presented bills similar to the larger music halls albeit with more modest line ups and a more bawdy clientele).

Overall one cannot but feel that there is an almost indecent haste with which JHM and Sarah are rushing to tie the knot, with Banns read only a month after Minnie’s burial. Ironically this proximity makes me think it increasingly likely that this Minnie is JHM’s second ‘wife’, and both he and Sarah had been impatiently waiting for her passing in order to get married. Barely a redeeming feature, but the wedding has the feel of a rather low key event.

Edited by Myrtle's cook, 22 June 2015 - 11:31 AM.


#151 Mike Franch

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 04:55 PM

THE DEATH OF MINNIE MACCANN


As a historian who has done a good bit of urban history, I'm enjoying this thread enormously, and greatly appreciating the quality of both the research and the speculation. (Well, excepting, perhaps, the alien abduction theory.)

But my inspiration for posting is to suggest that one of our members write a tune with the title quoted above.

#152 Rod

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 02:40 AM

' Trimming '. My 1927 edition of The New GRESHAM DICTIONARY of the English Language offers a definition of trimmer as "one who fluctuates between parties, or tries to keep on good terms with both". What does this reveal about the professor....if anything ! We are told he had ' odd notions ' about trimming !

#153 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 03:36 AM

THE DEATH OF MINNIE MACCANN


As a historian who has done a good bit of urban history, I'm enjoying this thread enormously, and greatly appreciating the quality of both the research and the speculation. (Well, excepting, perhaps, the alien abduction theory.)

But my inspiration for posting is to suggest that one of our members write a tune with the title quoted above.


Indeed! It does sound like a good title for a monologue at the very least.

#154 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 11:15 AM

The Banns Record records John Henry McCann (widower) and Sarah Jane Kennerley (s)
Wedding 11:30 April 22nd. Note that it is John HENRY in the Banns.
(Liverpool Libraries ref: 283/GRO/3/3)

The Marriage record ... has the correction of Henry to Hillam for JHM mentioned previously in this discussion thread.

-The correction of JHM’s middle name on the marriage record would seem to be that of an error carried over from the banns.

 

Only he was John HILL Maccann, Hill being his mother's family name, it was William who had the confusion over Hill and Hillham/Hilliam, his paternal grandmother's (if I remember rightly) maiden name.



#155 Crane Driver

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 03:41 AM

That 1908 wedding record is nowhere near as ‘innocent’ as MC’s post might suggest:

 

The groom gives his name as John Henry Maccann, musician, age 47, son of John Hill Maccann, deceased, also musician

 

John Hill Maccann was born about 1860, hence would be about 48 in 1908. How could he have a son aged 47?  Precocious or what?

 

The correction occurs in the groom’s own signature, and is the ‘wrong way round’ – he originally signed himself ‘John Hill Maccann’ and then corrected the ‘Hill’ to ‘Henry’

 

Who absent-mindedly signs his father’s name to the marriage register instead of his own?  JHM is deliberately misleading the Registrar

 

JHM married Eliza Wood Passmore Reed in 1878, in Plymouth, before his musical career really took off.  There is no record of the marriage being annulled

 

In the 1911 census, Eliza still considers herself to be married to JHM, though she presumably hasn’t seen him for years.  She lived until 1914.  Even with Minnie dead, JHM was not ‘free to marry’ in 1908 – not under his real name, anyway

 

1908_Wedding.jpg



#156 Myrtle's cook

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 04:09 AM

Fair comment Crane Driver, I was trying to stick to the facts and avoid rushing off in all directions of my own scatter brained interpretations/hypotheses. ...so here is one of them...

This deception does appear odd and perhaps unnecessary on the face of it - as everyone who might know JHM in Liverpool would have understood (wrongly) that he was married, in name as least, to the now deceased Minnie and thus free to remarry (if rather too hastily). JHM, his family and Eliza would certainly have known otherwise, but there is little I have seen to suggest that their circle extended to Liverpool. JHM also appears to have ceased his touring by this date and with it his national exposure. I did wonder whether the paranoia manifest when he was confined to Bethlem (Stephen Chamber's post 2 May 2015, above) never truly left and he feared he might be discovered through some process (cross checking of records?) and needed to take evasive action. Incidentally I have been looking for any evidence that he might have been admitted for care in Liverpool due to recurrence of his mental illness, but I have, to date, found no evidence.

The other possibility I considered, but dismissed, was that if speculation above concerning alcoholism is correct, then these might be the actions and errors of a barely 'functioning alcoholic'.

Edited by Myrtle's cook, 25 June 2015 - 04:47 AM.


#157 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 08:36 AM

The groom gives his name as John Henry Maccann, musician, age 47, son of John Hill Maccann, deceased, also musician

 

John Hill Maccann was born about 1860, hence would be about 48 in 1908. How could he have a son aged 47?  Precocious or what?

 

Whilst, if we're to be precise (as if ANYTHING in this nightmarish mess could be precise! :rolleyes: ), the only middle name we otherwise have for John Hill Maccann's father is Beckit (another "family" name, like Hilham) - in that he was John Beckit Macann at his only marriage, to Louisa Hanwell in Spalding, Lincs. in 1843 - and John Hill Maccann was born John Job Macann [sic] in Birmingham, Warwks. on 1st, 2nd OR 3rd January 1860, though he was baptised John Job Maccann at Plymouth, St Peter, Devon on 31st May 1866, but seemingly appears on the 1861 Census (in his maternal grandparents household) as John Hill! :huh:

 

Indeed there's possibly a precedent there for "disappearing" - in that it looks rather like John Beckit Macann, his much younger pupil Sarah Hill and their infant child John Job Macann/John Hill/John Hill Maccann "did a runner" from Birmingham, to Plymouth, to escape from the father's marriage to Louisa Hanwell and any scandal they may have caused... Could the change in the spelling of the family surname (from Macann to Maccann), around the same time, have been an attempt to disguise their identity?


Edited by Stephen Chambers, 29 June 2015 - 02:38 PM.





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