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Handel? Bach?


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#1 larryjhs

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 10:36 PM

hello there,

 

I've been playing for about 4 weeks now and I am getting into my 30  key Anglo. I've found a piece of Handel (the Harmonious Blacksmith in Minasi's Instruction Book for the Use of Learners of the German Concertina) that is linked of this site and on archive.org, but I'm looking for other scores  ( especially 'simple') pieces.  Can anyone help out for Bach, Handel, Hayden, Telleman or other Baroque, even if is for other instruments but usable given the key restrictions (I am relearning music after some decades). 

 

Thanks

 

Larry

 



#2 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 02:00 AM

There is a serries  of books   called  "The Joy of........."  (by  Yorktown Music Press):    mostly easy scores  for beginners , though many are for piano  they can be adapted  and  you can always transpose  melodies  to suit  the keys and range  of you concertina.    Their books cover  many genres  from Bach to Beatles. I  picked up  a couple  of these  at  flea markets  ( car boot  fairs.... garage sales.... whatever they are called  where you live)....

Have fun.



#3 larryjhs

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 02:45 AM

Thanks!



#4 wes williams

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 06:17 PM

A huge amount of Baroque music is available in midi format. Find a midi to score program ( scorecloud pops up on first google as a free one) and you have an almost unlimited source of sheet music.



#5 Jack Campin

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 07:39 AM

Try https://www.flutetunes.com - simplified classical music is their main thing.



#6 John Wild

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 09:48 AM

You could also try Classics for folk, which is volume 5 in the Pipers' companion series.

Publishers: Rossleigh music, Rossleigh House, Windsor Terrace, Newbiggin by the sea, Northumberland, NE64 6UJ

                     info@rossleighmusic.co.uk.



#7 David Barnert

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 11:30 PM

Why not poke around imslp.org ? An amazingly vast collection of public domain classical music in pdf format. Just type whatever you want (“Bach” for instance) in the search box and go nuts.



#8 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 04:08 PM

I treat classical and baroque music the same as folk music: I listen to it until it's in my head, then I arrange it, hands-on, for my instrument. This is usually the classic 5-string banjo, but I've done Romantic pieces this way on the Crane duet.

Baroque and Anglo? I wouldn't choose the Anglo for polyphonic music. But if you do, Handel should be more amenable than Bach.

 

Cheers,

John



#9 adrian brown

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 09:13 AM

Baroque and Anglo? I wouldn't choose the Anglo for polyphonic music. But if you do, Handel should be more amenable than Bach.

 

Cheers,

John

 

John, The biggest stumbling block to playing polyphonic music on an anglo is the lack of a low d, closely followed by the other 'holes' in its lowest octave. On an anglo with more than 30 buttons, you can normally arrange to have one of the extra LH buttons to be tuned to a low d, which gives you the possibility of playing an endless supply of music written before c.1650 and a lot more chance of adapting later pieces to fit the notes you do have. I don't think there's any intrinsic barrier in the instrument itself, and perhaps for many people, it might be a more logical format than the EC for playing 2-4 voice repertoire.

Adrian






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