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Haste To The Wedding Chords Alan Day


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#1 darticus

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 01:03 PM

This is a catchy tune but was wondering what might be played by the left hand to work with the right hand. I think this is in C but what buttons to play on the left hand in the measures. Hope someone can help with suggestions. Thanks Ron



#2 Robin Harrison

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 06:15 PM

Hi Ron...I hope this may help somewhat.

       1st...key is irrelevant actually. Just play it on what ever anglo you have.

Because you reference AlanD. , I assume you are an anglo player.

    Here is a fairly straightforward way to accompany a tune such as Haste.

You're just tapping out chords on the beat and it's essentially how William Kimber played.

    I've imaged the right hand first, just to show how the tune looks and then focused on the left hand.

 I've played it in "D" and I'm just bouncing around between D, A & G ( On a C/G it would be G, D & C, same fingering) 

         It's a very "percussive" way to accompany the tune but it is really, really good if you are struggling or starting to use your left hand.

        If you can start doing something like this then you can start to separate them into an "Oom" and a "Pah" and then you are getting somewhere.

          You can then change the "Pah" into an "Oom" and then eventually do runs of "Oom"s and you've got a lovely bass line going.

    I'm not putting this forward as comprehensive approach to the left hand on an anglo, I'm just offering a way in that's fairly painless.

            Forgive the sandwich remnants on my jeans........... I recorded it 53 times, waited 98 minutes to upload on YouTube and life is short!

Robin....................and played on a glorious 36 key G/D Dipper.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0vVwH0UrMh8



#3 darticus

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 07:06 AM

Hi Ron...I hope this may help somewhat.

       1st...key is irrelevant actually. Just play it on what ever anglo you have.

Because you reference AlanD. , I assume you are an anglo player.

    Here is a fairly straightforward way to accompany a tune such as Haste.

You're just tapping out chords on the beat and it's essentially how William Kimber played.

    I've imaged the right hand first, just to show how the tune looks and then focused on the left hand.

 I've played it in "D" and I'm just bouncing around between D, A & G ( On a C/G it would be G, D & C, same fingering) 

         It's a very "percussive" way to accompany the tune but it is really, really good if you are struggling or starting to use your left hand.

        If you can start doing something like this then you can start to separate them into an "Oom" and a "Pah" and then you are getting somewhere.

          You can then change the "Pah" into an "Oom" and then eventually do runs of "Oom"s and you've got a lovely bass line going.

    I'm not putting this forward as comprehensive approach to the left hand on an anglo, I'm just offering a way in that's fairly painless.

            Forgive the sandwich remnants on my jeans........... I recorded it 53 times, waited 98 minutes to upload on YouTube and life is short!

Robin....................and played on a glorious 36 key G/D Dipper.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=0vVwH0UrMh8

Thanks great video. I will study this and get what I can from it, I play it in the key of G. Will watch this over and over. Trying to see the fingering for the chords your using. Your right I'm using G,D and C.

Looks like your working with the two top buttons on the G and C rows. Still checking it out. Thanks very much Ron


Edited by darticus, 16 January 2017 - 07:57 AM.


#4 darticus

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 08:18 PM

Here is a pic of the music I have and can play. Where to put what chords where. GC and D would be the chords. I'm new to this but trying. Where would these cords be located? using a 30 button anglo.Thanks Ron

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#5 Jack Campin

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 06:36 AM

Where did you get that?  It's barely recognizable as the same tune as the one I know (always in D in Scotland).



#6 darticus

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 07:35 AM

Where did you get that?  It's barely recognizable as the same tune as the one I know (always in D in Scotland).

This came from the Alan Day tutor thats out there

http://www.etanbenam...ncertina Tutor/

At the very bottom of the list is the PDF File for the sheet music. Check it out.

I'm new to the Concertina and the push and pull kills the chord playing. I can play it on a keyboard but the push pull changes everything. Trying to use my guitar skills to make chords work by ear. Any help to get to chords would help. I'm playing a 30 button Anglo. Using for G 1, 2, 3 for D 6, 7, 8. Help is needed I like the Tune. Thanks Ron



#7 MJGray

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 08:39 PM

Ron,

 

As a fellow long-time guitar player and new concertina guy, I had much the same problem trying to translate what I know about chordal accompaniment on string instruments to the concertina. It just doesn't work very well, and that push-pull dynamic really is a big issue. What's helped me is that I've realized is that you simply can't hold down a chord shape on the concertina for any length of time. It's all rhythmic pulsing, even if you're using the exact same chord shape.

 

In fact, the shorter I go with sounding individual chords, the better it seems to sound, especially against a melody line in the right hand. That might have to do with the fact you (or at least I) can't really separate the volume of what each hand is playing, so keeping the accompaniment notes short compared to the melody notes helps keep the melody from getting overwhelmed. (I feel like maybe I read that on this site somewhere, actually.)

 

Now what I haven't figured out is how to accompany myself singing on the concertina, although I know there are plenty of folks on here who have that pretty well mastered. Luckily, I have a guitar for that, so it's not the highest thing on my priority list...

 

Hope that's slightly helpful.

 

Mike



#8 darticus

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:34 AM

Ron,

 

As a fellow long-time guitar player and new concertina guy, I had much the same problem trying to translate what I know about chordal accompaniment on string instruments to the concertina. It just doesn't work very well, and that push-pull dynamic really is a big issue. What's helped me is that I've realized is that you simply can't hold down a chord shape on the concertina for any length of time. It's all rhythmic pulsing, even if you're using the exact same chord shape.

 

In fact, the shorter I go with sounding individual chords, the better it seems to sound, especially against a melody line in the right hand. That might have to do with the fact you (or at least I) can't really separate the volume of what each hand is playing, so keeping the accompaniment notes short compared to the melody notes helps keep the melody from getting overwhelmed. (I feel like maybe I read that on this site somewhere, actually.)

 

Now what I haven't figured out is how to accompany myself singing on the concertina, although I know there are plenty of folks on here who have that pretty well mastered. Luckily, I have a guitar for that, so it's not the highest thing on my priority list...

 

Hope that's slightly helpful.

 

Mike

As an old guitar player and accordion player you are right. Wow! Push pull what a trip. I almost think this is an instrument to play by ear and see what works. Concertina is a Nice light fun instrument. Gotta give it a chance. TOO OLD for the girls to chase an old guitar player so concertina is good no crowds! Thanks Ron






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