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Help Requested - 48 Ec Arrangement


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#19 Jody Kruskal

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 03:24 PM

Hi Jody, the problem with the high "G" not is not that it wouldn't be playable but that there's a huge emphasis right here, and I'm not sure if the treble ECs I have been playing as yet are capable of that, soundwise.

 

Best wishes - Wolf

In response, Wolf... here is what I wrote before:

 

"Wolf - Yes, this is a bit high, but my thinking as for the Key... I have put it at Em because the following sections will then be in G and C... should I write them. Em, G and C all seem like likely easy keys for the 48 EC and with their available bass notes should access likely achievable and satisfactory harmonies. and accompaniment options."

 

So, this score is just the first of three sections all in different keys. Em would put the two remaining sections in G and C. Cm would put them in Eb and Ab. My guess is that these would not be friendly keys. How about the first section in Dm? Then, the two remaining sections would be in F and Bb which would be more facile, right? The lower I go the harder it is to build satisfying inner parts as some of the bass notes would have to go up an octave and room for voicings will get squeezed.

 

Do you think that taking it down a whole step to Dm would make much difference? Then, that high passage at mes. 21 would start on an F instead of a G.



#20 JimLucas

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:44 PM

Ive been asked to make a score of the lovely Waltz #2 by Dimitri Shostakovich, https://www.youtube....h?v=mmCnQDUSO4I
arrangement for 48 button English Concertina.


To expand on my earlier response: Who is intended to play this arrangement? What is their experience with the English concertina? For that matter, is this arrangement being commissioned by an individual who intends to play it, or by someone who intends it as a "gift" for someone else to play? I might guess the latter, else the person intending to play it could be trying your successive versions and giving their own feedback.
 

Wolf - Yes, this is a bit high, but my thinking as for the Key... I have put it at Em because the following sections will then be in G and C... should I write them. Em, G and C all seem like likely easy keys for the 48 EC and with their available bass notes should access likely achievable and satisfactory harmonies. and accompaniment options.

So, this score is just the first of three sections all in different keys. Em would put the two remaining sections in G and C. Cm would put them in Eb and Ab. My guess is that these would not be friendly keys.


Once again, "friendly" depends on the competence and experience of the player. I would hope that anyone capable of playing an arrangement as full (complex?) as this would be comfortable in any key from three flats to four sharps, though various posts here on concertina.net suggest that many otherwise-competent players of the English never try to go beyond one flat or two sharps due to prejudices inherited from other instruments.

In key signatures from three flats to four sharps, the physical pattern of the scale is almost identical, the only difference being that some of the notes (consistently in every octave) are in an outer column of buttons rather than an inner one... physically closer than on most anglos. In fact, the key of Eb (or Cm) may have advantages over C (or Am), because two notes of the scale are duplicated (Eb=D# and Ab=G#) in every octave, appearing on both ends of the instrument. Thus it's possible -- though not necessarily common -- that an awkward "default" fingering can be rendered less awkward by substituting an appropriate enharmonic. Conceptually, that's not much different from using an opposite-direction button for D, G, or A on the C/G anglo. On the English, there is no such option in the keys of C or G (though I often substitute Eb for the D# if an Em tune calls for a B7 chord).

Even the key of Ab shouldn't be particularly difficult, as only one note of the scale is "out of pattern".  I.e., the Db needs to be played as C# (which is on the opposite end of the instrument from D). I personally don't find this very different from being forced to use the third row to play a C# on a C/G anglo... or a G# if we want to put it in the context of an "uncommon" key.
 

How about the first section in Dm? Then, the two remaining sections would be in F and Bb which would be more facile, right?


See my above comments.
 

The lower I go the harder it is to build satisfying inner parts as some of the bass notes would have to go up an octave and room for voicings will get squeezed.


And that leads me to another potential issue. I think it would be much more reasonable to arrange this piece for a standard (56-button) tenor-treble English. Same top note as a 48-button treble, but an extra fifth -- down to C below middle C -- for the "bass". In fact, if you left the piece (at least that first section) in the original key of Cm, then the lowest note on the instrument would be the tonic of that key, providing a sound (pun noticed) foundation.

However, I do recognize that if this arrangement is intended for a particular individual and that individual is unable to get their hands on a tenor-treble, then that isn't really an option.

#21 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:59 PM

...or if the player has a low F available (or would be willing to get himself one, resp. two) the arrangement could in fact simply be transposed "down" to D-min. Although I see your point Jim, I guess a C-section in Ab-maj would scare more concertinists off than the key of Bb-maj. And Jody - yes, I guess one whole step would in fact make a difference.

#22 JimLucas

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 05:33 PM

Although I see your point Jim, I guess a C-section in Ab-maj would scare more concertinists off than the key of Bb-maj.

 
But are those who would be scared off capable of playing fluidly even most of Jody's arrangement?  I don't think it's by any means something to be played by a beginner, and it includes some quite "interesting" jumps and combinations* for the fingers, even for someone who normally uses a 4-finger style.  But that is an actual question, since (as I noted above) many players never go beyond keys that others have labeled as "simple", even though several other keys -- on the English -- are not really more complex, neither geometrically nor muscularly.
 

* I'm especially curious as to what fingering you would use for measure 25 of the initial arrangement... and how you would get there from measure 24.


But I repeat... If this is an arrangement intended for a particular individual, then it's critically important that it should be targeted to that individual's abilities, not to some theoretical "more concertinists".



#23 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 06:10 PM

* I'm especially curious as to what fingering you would use for measure 25 of the initial arrangement... and how you would get there from measure 24.


1 to 4 = index finger to pinky - Right hand: last beat of bar 24: C=3, E=4, bar 25: e=1, g=2, D=4, then hold e + g like before, A=3, C = 4, I guess; but as mentioned, it's hardly playable at all, and altered in the meantime.

#24 Jody Kruskal

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Posted Yesterday, 02:08 AM

As for your comments, yes, this arrangement is intended and commissioned for/by a specific 48 EC player (low G) who will be unnamed so far. My request for help is intended to help me present him with a playable arrangement with all these considerations handled, so he does not have to compare options but has a workable arrangement at first go. He does have considerable skills and is a student of the master Matusawitz.

 

So Jim and Wolf, what do you think of setting this down a whole step putting it in Dm? Would that really be an improvement? Aside from the benefit of a reduction in pitch and the deficit of reduced harmony opportunities, would that add or subtract from the fingering difficulties?

 

Your help is greatly appreciated.


Edited by Jody Kruskal, Yesterday, 02:35 AM.


#25 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted Yesterday, 03:53 AM

Jody, I'll gladly given it a go - and, albeit of course not necessarily required, could you provide us with an ABC, to make things easier accessible?

Best wishes - Wolf



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