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Right Elbow Soreness


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#1 Breve

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 09:09 PM

Hi, the muscles around my right elbow joint become sore after playing. Of course I'll stop and stretch and massage the area but this an ongoing side effect playing. Has anyone else experienced this?

I play an entry level anglo - a Stagi. The bellows are stiff and sometimes it feels I'm fighting them and it probably doesn't have the best action either. I've realised the fast jerky pull/push is what's contributing to this soreness, plus holding elbow at a certain angle - roughly 90 degrees, so I'm rethinking the fingerings to include more runs of notes on the draw or on the pull and reduce the jerkiness a little (every minimal change must help, right?). Trying to play louder - getting more air - exacerbates this. I usually play softly because I live in an apartment but on the weekend I was playing with other musicians and so had to be louder and noticed how much the soreness bothered me.

I can't see how I can alter the angle my arm needs to be to play. This soreness happens regularly from using computer - the posture, typing etc. So alas I've become used to it but it is more noticeably sore after playing. Clearly I need to change what I'm doing!

Any other suggestions apart from upgrading to a better concertina which is a future goal but not possible for now. Arm strengthening exercises - resistance bands, hand weights? Shorter practice sessions? Thanks.

#2 David Barnert

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 02:28 AM

It’s likely “tennis elbow,” an inflammation of the bony part of the elbow where the tendons of the muscles that extend the forearm attach. Go to any pharmacy and buy a tennis elbow strap, which decreases tension at the attachment, and see if that helps.

 

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#3 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 03:50 AM

I imagine  you to be  'new to playing the  concertina' , if that is the case  then  the pains are probably quite nomal.  I find whenever I take up an  new instrument  there is a period, sometimes of quite long duration, where  sets of  muscles  need to  get used to the new  demands  on them.

 

Yes a  better concertina will  help:  there were  no such things  as  cheap  'beginner' concertinas when I started,  it was  Vintage  or nothing  so  perhaps I don't understand the level of  pain  you may encounter.

 

Yes, shorter practice sessions  will help.  I have recently taken  up the  Chromatic  Button Accordeon  and I  try to limit  the  duration of my practice  sessions  to  15minutes  several times a day  at the start.... it helped.

 

Good luck  . :)


Edited by Geoff Wooff, 19 March 2018 - 06:44 AM.


#4 Breve

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 07:23 AM

Thanks to you both for replying. Now I have an idea of what to call this condition. Reading up about it, strengthening arm and shoulder muscles is necessary - so I'd better get onto that. I'll shorten my practice time and look into a strap also. I'm fairly new but not a complete beginner. The muscles should've adjusted by now but clearly I need to do some extra exercises. My goal is to save up for an upgrade and in the meantime work diligently on the Stagi to literally outgrow it. Of course I realize progress is faster on a better instrument but I'll have to be patient. I tested a friend's Norman on the weekend and could feel the difference in bellows and action. It confirmed my decision to upgrade for long term playing comfort.

#5 Halifax

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 02:43 PM

Hey, Breve:

I am not a doctor or anything close, but you want to watch those repetitive motion injuries. You want to keep the swelling down, so before a long session, you might take an anti-inflammatory (like Advil) and after a long session, ice your elbow (best thing is a package of frozen peas wrapped in a towel---you don't want to freeze the skin). Also, it's very chic these days to support strained muscles and joints with KT tape. My daughter uses it to help prevent injuries to her feet (she's a percussive dancer) and it seems to help. Plus, at $15 per roll, I feel like I'm helping the economy. :) Here's some info on taping your elbow: https://www.livestro...r-tennis-elbow/

 

If it keeps bothering you, talk to your doctor; she may give you a referral to a physiotherapist.

 

Best, of luck,

 

Christine



#6 Breve

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 10:57 PM

Thank you Christine for the advice. I meant to reply sooner to your post but have been travelling.




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