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Mr Beveridge's Maggot


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#19 michael sam wild

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 06:40 AM

Lovely tune , lovely playing thanks. Oliver Sacks in Musicophilia(2008) uses the earworm or brainworm analogy for a tune that bores its way in like a maggot in an apple.p 44 et seq.(I'm not convinced)

Edited by michael sam wild, 08 November 2009 - 06:44 AM.


#20 Steve Mansfield

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 07:02 AM

The basic arrangement is here.

Thanks for posting that, I shall enjoy making a right old racket until I get the hang of it (unless the family confiscate the Wheatstone first :) ).

#21 JimLucas

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 12:31 PM

Lovely tune , lovely playing thanks. Oliver Sacks in Musicophilia(2008) uses the earworm or brainworm analogy for a tune that bores its way in like a maggot in an apple.p 44 et seq.(I'm not convinced)

It sounds as if Sacks is using the non-musical definition of "maggot" to create an analogy or a new usage, not even close to giving a definition or explanation of the word "maggot" as used in the names of tunes centuries before he was born.

#22 Steve Mansfield

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 12:38 PM

Lovely tune , lovely playing thanks. Oliver Sacks in Musicophilia(2008) uses the earworm or brainworm analogy for a tune that bores its way in like a maggot in an apple.p 44 et seq.(I'm not convinced)

It sounds as if Sacks is using the non-musical definition of "maggot" to create an analogy or a new usage, not even close to giving a definition or explanation of the word "maggot" as used in the names of tunes centuries before he was born.

I don't know if this definition from AnswerBag adds clarity or just more confusion ....

(edited to korect a tyo)

Edited by Steve Mansfield, 08 November 2009 - 12:39 PM.


#23 JimLucas

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 01:18 PM

I don't know if this definition from AnswerBag adds clarity or just more confusion ....

Interesting.
And weren't parasitic infections much more common in those days? So there might even have been some truth to it.

Dunno about Swift's contention that a hexagonal bite produces poetry, though. More likely a mechanical innovation. Happened to CW, and look what we got. :D

#24 michael sam wild

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 01:20 PM

Sounds good to me but I'm still interested in any etymological link. Isn't the -ot a diminutive in French?
Or Major - big as opposed to Minuet -little. To describe steps




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