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Tips To Go From Sluggish To Bouncing?


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#19 alex_holden

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Posted Yesterday, 01:53 AM

I've often seen a certain amount of sluggishness come from beginners trying to force the tune out of the instrument and thinking that pushing or pulling ever harder somehow will make it work better through brute force. That might work if you're a blacksmith, but not so much for enjoyable or danceable tunes!


There's a rhythm to forging too. If you try to force the metal you'll just end up injuring yourself.

#20 Daniel Hersh

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Posted Yesterday, 01:56 AM

This may be obvious, but perhaps not: spend lots of time listening to recordings of concertina players you want to emulate.  If possible, try to learn at least some tunes by ear rather than with sheet music, because sheet music rarely captures the kinds of subtleties you're concerned about. 



#21 TimTim

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Posted Yesterday, 06:57 AM

Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

I feel really embarrassed now - so much advice ! thank you. I've been having internet connection problems and thought that was the problem but I still can't upload my recording... 

 

But having read all your comments I can see how my little piece is a textbook example of everything beginners do. 

 

Daniel Hersh, thank you for yet another useful link. 

 

There's a lot more discipline that has to go into it than I ever thought...

 

To sum up (for my sake):

 

- know the tune...really know it

- listen to more recordings rather than relying on music sheet (guilty as charged, even more damaging in my case as I'm not good at reading rhythm)

- record yourself (you wouldn't believe what it did to me, it was both mortifying and enlightening)

- review your position - stable but flexible

- vary vary vary

 

 

 

 


Edited by TimTim, Yesterday, 07:02 AM.


#22 Geoff Wooff

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Posted Yesterday, 09:50 AM

Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

I feel really embarrassed now - so much advice ! thank you. I've been having internet connection problems and thought that was the problem but I still can't upload my recording... 

 

But having read all your comments I can see how my little piece is a textbook example of everything beginners do. 

 

Daniel Hersh, thank you for yet another useful link. 

 

There's a lot more discipline that has to go into it than I ever thought...

 

To sum up (for my sake):

 

- know the tune...really know it

- listen to more recordings rather than relying on music sheet (guilty as charged, even more damaging in my case as I'm not good at reading rhythm)

- record yourself (you wouldn't believe what it did to me, it was both mortifying and enlightening)

- review your position - stable but flexible

- vary vary vary

 

 

 

 

AND... in the end  do not JUST blame yourself.  The  instrument has to take some  critique too.

 

Many of those  that are giving  advice  here, myself included,  did not begin our concertina journey  on one of the  current  ' starter models', there simply  was nothing like this on offer years ago.  The best thing that can be said  of  the  Jackie, Jack, Rochelle and Elise   is their great value  for money. People on C.net  recommend them  as being the best  of the super cheap.  Their  instant availability  makes them ideal  for someone  who wishes to  try the concertina  for the first time, or  see if a different keyboard type would suit them  better.  Perhaps  one gets too much for  the money  and  this leads to compromises  which show up directly in the playability.  They are harder work  and I certainly  would not want to  use one in a dance band.

 

I  do not mean to  knock  these offerings from  Concertina Connection  but  I  think one should view them as  a sampler.  The  very fact that  a  money back trade-in is offered when  one  up-grades   tells its own story.



#23 TimTim

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Posted Yesterday, 11:21 AM

Thanks Geoff, 

 

it's something I was quite aware of when I bought it - happy enough that I could afford it! 

Besides I live in Brussels and don't know anyone who - should I get the money (! very unlikely) - could help me buy a better one. 

I don't want to feel discouraged and give up, blaming everything (or a lot) on the instrument. There is a lot I can learn and improve with the Jackie, I'm sure. 

 

 

[edit] I couldn't help myself : used 48 buttons Nickolds EC for 80$    :)


Edited by TimTim, Yesterday, 11:24 AM.


#24 Geoff Wooff

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Posted Yesterday, 01:18 PM

  Oooh!  I  would not go there either  TimTim  . :blink: 

 

An old  clunker like  that can be just as hard work  to play  if not harder.

 

If you need advice  on what to  look for  as an up-grade  I am sure you will get plenty  on   C;Net. :) 

 

.

 

Thanks Geoff, 

 

[edit] I couldn't help myself : used 48 buttons Nickolds EC for 80$    :)



#25 Mike Franch

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Posted Yesterday, 04:16 PM

TimTim, thank you for starting this thread. As you can see from my description on the left, I've been around here for a little while. I'm not entirely new to this--but I'm picking up many helpful suggestions from the fine musicians who are advising you.

You might think you're only asking for yourself. In fact, your asking helps many of us. Please keep it up!

Mike

#26 TimTim

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Posted Today, 03:20 AM

No worries - I didn't go there ! 

 

Now working on a few tunes from Paul Hardy's Tunebooks and listening to their version on Youtube over and over...and having a great time!

If it means at some point working against the instrument rather than being helped by it, so be it! The reason I started the concertina in the first place was because I would push a button and sound would come out...really as basic as that  :D . I'm already grateful and amazed at how much interest, curiosity and pleasure it has brought me. 

 

(thank you Mike Franch, I love this forum. I've sometimes read threads I didn't understand just for the pleasure of seeing heated conversations about the concertina)





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