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Im Learning From Yousician, But Still Need Advice. On Duet Or Anglo


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#1 cryptastix

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 01:48 AM

I have had professional help. which.... basically taught me... I'm wasting my money.  I need information. Not someone that will sit there and help me learn key by key....       I can do that easy on my own time.

 

These instruments are a freaking hard thing to learn. And even harder to learn how to play them.

 

at very very very least, on a fundamental level. yousician does that. 

 

I know its just a game. but it finally forced me to switch from an anglo to a duet. I have no other option.

 

What am I looking at getting into?

 

I need to beable to play on yousician

 

im looking at the elsie from buttonbox. (btw... buttonbox, they are phenomenal on so many levels) again... worth mentioning. they know what they are doing. and also own greg from here.

 

So since I am going to use yousician as essentially a teacher. Does the elise have the capability to play MOST of the piano staff?

 

I ran into problems with the low D on my anglo...... god that would have been useful.(on the other direction) and a couple others on various rows.

 

The Low C on anglos, how does that coincide with a duet I'm thinking of getting?

 

because yousician will only recognize Notes based off middle c, the true pitch.

 

 

this is a sincere thankyou

 

 

 

 



#2 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 05:24 AM

cryptastix,

I hadn't heard of Yousician before, so I googled it. According to the website, it's "The easiest way to learn guitar, piano, bass and ukulele." No mention of sax, tombone, violin - or even concertina!

 

You seem to be trying to apply the piano version of Yousician to the concertina, so it's no wonder you're getting frustrated. I doubt whether changing from Anglo to Duet concertina will help. The chromatic layout of the duets (or rather, most of the duets, excluding the smaller Haydens like the Elise) does give them a similar set of notes to the piano, but their arrangement is totally differnt, and has to be learnt for each specific system of duet.

 

Take my tip, and stay with the Anglo. After all, the reason why it became so popular back in the 19th century was because a reasonably musical person could learn to play simple tunes on it without expensive or time-consuming tuition! When you've got the basics, you can look to teachers - or perhaps better, coaches - for help with the advanced stuff.

 

Cheers,

John



#3 cryptastix

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 10:09 AM

cryptastix,

I hadn't heard of Yousician before, so I googled it. According to the website, it's "The easiest way to learn guitar, piano, bass and ukulele." No mention of sax, tombone, violin - or even concertina!

 

You seem to be trying to apply the piano version of Yousician to the concertina, so it's no wonder you're getting frustrated. I doubt whether changing from Anglo to Duet concertina will help. The chromatic layout of the duets (or rather, most of the duets, excluding the smaller Haydens like the Elise) does give them a similar set of notes to the piano, but their arrangement is totally differnt, and has to be learnt for each specific system of duet.

 

Take my tip, and stay with the Anglo. After all, the reason why it became so popular back in the 19th century was because a reasonably musical person could learn to play simple tunes on it without expensive or time-consuming tuition! When you've got the basics, you can look to teachers - or perhaps better, coaches - for help with the advanced stuff.

 

Cheers,

John

 

 

 

yes. I am also an amature guitar player also.

 

I really, really, appreciate you taking the time to answer my question. 

 

The answer is Yes I strongly need yousician. I strongly dislike their customer service.... strongly.... but no other company. theres more to get into than that. but its simply not worth getting into.

 

because I love the app. and I'm a musician that has nobody to play with, except that app. ALSO direct feed back on musician timing.

 

 

the thing I ran into a problem with my anglo was the clef staff.

 

Make no mistake, my concertinas are going no where. the training wheels on the anglo taught me something no other teacher could.... even when I was taking trumpet/horn/drums in grade school.  

 

The anglo taught me the fundamentals of harmony with out a single word.... yet this is an extremely hard instrument to learn.

 

that's the one that I'm always holds a special place in my heart.



#4 Patrick Scannell

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 06:40 PM

Hey cryptastix,  The Elise is great for the price and it works great with yousician, but it does not have an E-flat nor a G-sharp.   This will present a hangup at level three of yousician.   Button Box has a Stagi Hayden Duet that should meet your needs, but if you could swing it, a Beaumont is wonderful.

 

Good luck, Patrick



#5 Don Taylor

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 06:49 PM

How do you use Yousician with a concertina?

Patrick, how restrictive would a Peacock be in Yousician, or a standard 48 button EC?

I am intrigued by the suggestion to use Yousician for an instrument that they apparently do not support.

Don.

Edited by Don Taylor, 25 August 2017 - 07:16 PM.


#6 Patrick Scannell

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 07:16 PM

Apparently Yousician listens to the microphone and analyses the sound to determine what note you are playing.  It had no trouble with either my Elise or my Beaumont playing either single notes or triads.  I used it for the first time today and was impressed.  I ran it on a Samsung notepad.

 

Can't see why a Peacock or EC wouldn't work fine.   I would have suggested a Peacock to cryptastix, but the ButtonBox does not happen to have one in stock.

 

I'm using the Piano mode of Yousician, and other than the lesson to practice "Thumb-under" everything so far has fit the Hayden just fine.

 

Patrick



#7 cryptastix

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

Hey cryptastix,  The Elise is great for the price and it works great with yousician, but it does not have an E-flat nor a G-sharp.   This will present a hangup at level three of yousician.   Button Box has a Stagi Hayden Duet that should meet your needs, but if you could swing it, a Beaumont is wonderful.

 

Good luck, Patrick

 

 

this is some information that is well worth looking into. thankyou my man



#8 cryptastix

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 09:31 PM

How do you use Yousician with a concertina?

Patrick, how restrictive would a Peacock be in Yousician, or a standard 48 button EC?

I am intrigued by the suggestion to use Yousician for an instrument that they apparently do not support.

Don.

 

 

sorry for the double post. It just listens to the notes you play.

 

its completely for free. gives you feedback for 30 min a day. 

 

I use musescore, then just convert the file to yousician, and it plays... relatively.... decently.

 

I like country roads from john Denver :)

 

Edit: Or would it just be advisable to play a D instrument (like one of my favorite players) 

 

to get the lower range on the bass clef? 


Edited by cryptastix, 26 August 2017 - 02:05 AM.


#9 cryptastix

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:59 AM

ok... this is what I'm thinking.

 

Can I play the lower register on a G/d Anglo.

 

All I truly need is to beable to properly play the bass clef. But Then that also will require that, It has the capability of playing in the key of C. 


Edited by cryptastix, 26 August 2017 - 03:05 AM.


#10 Don Taylor

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 08:54 AM

So, is your problem with not having the notes in the lower range?

If you go to the Button Box web-site and look at the pages for their own new instruments (the Ceili etc...) then they have note charts for each of the instruments. You will be able to check out the bottom notes for the concertina types that you are considering.

For example, on a G/D Anglo the lowest note is the G on the bottom line of the bass staff, for (most) Hayden's including the Elise the lowest note would be the C below middle C - which is around the middle of the bass staff.

The piano has an enormous range for a single instrument and you are asking too much to get that sort of range in a small, portable instrument like a concertina.

Edited by Don Taylor, 26 August 2017 - 12:39 PM.


#11 cryptastix

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:42 AM

piano has an enormous range for a single instrument and you are asking too much to get that sort of range in a small, portable instrument like a concertina.

 

 

absolutely correct! That's why I use musescore to transpose the notation. I have just been struggling to learn how to construct song arrangements. and the lessons give some basic info on that. Its extremely annoying that I cannot just transpose their lessons to suit my C/G.

 

Ill look up the note chart. But I am still also struggling to fully understand. 

 

So on a comparable C/g concertina, how difficult is it to play in the key of C on a G/d instrument? Is it like playing in the key of D on a C/g? 



#12 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 06:09 PM

 

So on a comparable C/g concertina, how difficult is it to play in the key of C on a G/d instrument? Is it like playing in the key of D on a C/g? 

 

No, the key of C on a G/D would be the same fingering as the key of F on a C/G.

 

Cheers,

John



#13 cryptastix

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 11:12 AM

im reading bertram levys

 

american fiddle styles for the anglo concertina. He talks about the scale of F too for the 30 button. the keys of C/g/f/&d

 

soooo then the question becomes, how difficult is it to play in the key of F on a 30 button C/G?



#14 Bruce McCaskey

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

Not too difficult in the upper octave of the left side so long as you use your ring finger on the inner (G) row button for your G's and A's if they are adjacent (just before or just after) any Bb's. This permits you to avoid jumping your index finger to play those notes on the middle © row in ordered sequence with a Bb.

For the lowest Bb you'll likely use the little or ring finger, depending on whether you have C or lower note immediately before or after the Bb. You may need to swap to using the middle finger on the C to free up both the ring and little fingers to play lower note sequences in some tunes.

I find that Bb's are rarely an issue on the right side once you figure out where the correct button is located on the outside (sometimes called "accidental") row and learn to reach your ring finger over to it. As with so many things about learning Anglo, you just have to identify where you need to make an fingering adjustment, decide on the best approach and then get used to it.

You can pretty much use your default approach for the other notes in tunes.

Edited by Bruce McCaskey, 30 August 2017 - 12:00 PM.




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