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What Would You Change About Concertina Design?


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#37 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 09:22 PM

'Ardie' is (was?) the same person.

 
Well, he was a bit pushy, but I didn't and wouldn't mean to have him banned for that at all - didn't compare to "Chromaduet" f.i. - you won't tell me they're identical too, will you John?  :rolleyes:

#38 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 04:27 AM

Basically, I find the concertinas as they are perfectly OK. Obviously, better-made, more expensive models may sound better and be easier to play (e.g. better levers), but this is the case with all musical instruments. Improvements here are a matter of investment rather than invention.

 

I think the place for wishes is in the human interface - the points where the hands and fingers make contact with the instrument.

 

I have a Stagi 30-k Anglo, a Lachenal 48-k Crane and a small no-name Bandoneon (104 tones = 52 buttons). I have no problem with the Lachenal's 4.5 mm, the Stagi's 5 mm or the Bandoneon's 9.5 mm diameter buttons. I don't notice the difference between the Lachenal and Stagi buttons, and the large Bandoneon buttons seem consistent with the greater overall size of the instrument.

 

I have found the handstraps to be an important part of the human interface - I prefer stout, stiff ones - but these are wear parts anyway, can be exchanged by the player, and are available in different thicknesses and qualities. Again, a matter of (very modest!) investment.

 

The one feature that has bothered me is the air-button on the Stagi Anglo. Access to this is somehow obstructed by the handrest, and I had to shave down the shoulder of the rest, and fit an elongated button, to make it comfortable. I have heard of other players who find the air-button of their Anglos too far away, or too close, or wrongly aligned, so this is obviously a chance for improvement.

 

So what I would like to see is an air-lever like on the Bandoneon: Hinged on the top flat of the action box, and crossing the thumb at right angles. It is possible to position the lever for access by both long and short thumbs, and make it long enough to be found blind by the thumb.

I even thought of a user modification involving a bent teaspoon handle hinged to the top flat, and with a cork or felt pad bearing down on the actual air-button.

 

I've seen pics of old German Anglos with a lever hinged to the handrest (and thus basically parallel to the thumb), but that obviously didn't catch on. I would find the Bandoneon-style lever more useful.

 

Cheers,

John



#39 Jake Middleton-Metcalfe

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 08:34 AM

I agree with what you are saying about the air lever meeting the thumb at a right angle. It seems to me that the thumb is more suited to this movement. Colin dipper would apparently agree with you too on this one from what a friend of mine says. 



#40 nicx66

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 06:55 AM

Photo on 4-12-15 at 7.45 AM.jpg as origami is another hobby, i have often wondered about different bellows design 


Edited by nicx66, 12 April 2015 - 07:07 AM.


#41 nicx66

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 07:31 AM

Photo on 5-22-15 at 8.26 AM #2.jpg Photo on 5-22-15 at 8.26 AM.jpg  one of the main differences with this design is that the center air column/hexagon is offfset, whereas in a traditional design it lines up with the outside. Also, it is made from one rectangle of material and meets at a standing seam. birch bark is for decorative effect, though it is waterproof. this design has been utilized by a young lady who makes collapsable, lightweight homeless shelters. http://cardborigami.org


Edited by nicx66, 19 November 2016 - 07:32 PM.


#42 nicx66

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 01:06 PM

I have continued to contemplate a couple of things. First, can this design be adapted for a concertina bellows? presuming it could be, it would have to function as well as, or indeed better than, a traditional bellows design to justify its use. A couple of things I have observed with my models. most collapsible origami employs a twisting motion, which would not work for a concertina bellows as it would twist your hands. In eliminating this twisting motion, my existing design starts to get stressed at around 70% of full expansion. After repeated use, the paper forms its own gussets to deal with this stress. To solve this would require actual gussets, however, where to locate them is problematic. The peaks would be the best placement for design and function. The papers natural tendency is in the middle of the valleys. For continuity, i use some basic origami lingo. mountain folds=peaks VS valley folds=valleys. Photo on 2-8-16 at 12.59 PM.jpg  


Edited by nicx66, 08 February 2016 - 06:39 PM.


#43 Patrick Scannell

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 11:16 PM

The origami bellows (light, cheap, diy) sounds good for reed testing bellows at least.

 

I'd like to see a Hayden with a right hand button field scale ascending from pinky to index just as it does on the left side.  With the fingering I use, this would give the pinky 1/7 of the scale, and the stronger fingers 2/7 each just as exists on the left hand side.   Uniform chord fingering pattens is another plus.

 

Anyone seen this suggestion before?  Any downside?



#44 rlgph

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Posted 20 February 2016 - 02:08 PM

The origami bellows (light, cheap, diy) sounds good for reed testing bellows at least.
 
I'd like to see a Hayden with a right hand button field scale ascending from pinky to index just as it does on the left side.  With the fingering I use, this would give the pinky 1/7 of the scale, and the stronger fingers 2/7 each just as exists on the left hand side.   Uniform chord fingering pattens is another plus.
 
Anyone seen this suggestion before?  Any downside?


I was told by Wim Wakker that the Peacock and the Wakker Haydens can be ordered with ascending or descending button arrangements on either side. Indeed, my Peacock has an ascending right side and a descending left side button arrangement. I find it a more natural fit to the way my brain works.

#45 Patrick Scannell

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Posted 20 February 2016 - 07:07 PM

 

I was told by Wim Wakker that the Peacock and the Wakker Haydens can be ordered with ascending or descending button arrangements on either side. Indeed, my Peacock has an ascending right side and a descending left side button arrangement. I find it a more natural fit to the way my brain works.

 

Interesting.  So your Peacock is the reverse of my Beaumont.   Anyone else have a custom button arrangement?

My Geuns C-system bandonion descends on both sides and I find that an easy fit for both hands and brain.



#46 Bruce Thomson

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 01:48 AM

I'm currently attempting to outsource the creation of the Concertina Nova, using UpWork.

There are several bidders competing to do the job, I'm unsure whether any will do well, but progress is full of trial and error.

 

See sketch attached, and website with more details at http://bit.ly/1TFLQ2z

 

By the way, the flexible thumb strap, and the under-knees strap are well proven after a year of trial, on two concertinas I have.

I wouldn't go back to a conventional concertina now.

 

If this Forum isn't suitable I'll move the discussion to the Concertina building and repair forum instead.

 

Kind regards,

Bruce Thomson in New Zealand.

Attached Thumbnails

  • !Concertina Nova Drawing 01.png

Edited by Bruce Thomson, 26 May 2016 - 01:54 AM.


#47 JeremyMcClain

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 09:25 PM

I'm a total newbie. I would like the octagon corners to be less sharp. I'm expecting a new callus I'd rather not have. Or perhaps someone has a hint. Adjusting the straps hasn't helped so far.

 

Jeremy



#48 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:10 AM

I'm a total newbie. I would like the octagon corners to be less sharp. I'm expecting a new callus I'd rather not have. Or perhaps someone has a hint. Adjusting the straps hasn't helped so far.

 

Jeremy

Hello!

Tell us please  what sort  of 'octagon'   you are having  problems with  ,  you never know  someone here might suggest a solution.



#49 JeremyMcClain

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:17 PM

Thanks for asking. I realize now I was vague.

 

The end plates on my Anglo are octagon shaped. After a few hours playing, the Mount of Venus (the area where the thumb meets the palm) on my right hand is sore from the point of the octagon digging in when I push air out. I'm practicing pushing equally with both hands, but the right is the one that gets sore.

 

Jeremy






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