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Wolf Molkentin

TT modification on the low end (D# to B?)

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Posted (edited)

Hi everyone,

my apologies for another - as for me, unexpected - recess. It has become quite difficult to stick at making music (and then discussing it here) as I'm vocationally occupied a lot these days, and very tired in the evenings. However, I've taken up the concertina once again some weeks ago, and after another lovely - and very sunny! - concertina weekend in the tranquility of Wendland I took the courage (if not boldness) to aquire an apparently very fine metal-ended tenor-treble Aeola (C to C, four octaves).

It might be no surprise to those who've got to know me a little over the years that I'm already making plans for modifying the layout. As I've been very happy with my low F on the treble(s) I'm now considering to alter the D# (left side) to a B (solderwise), reckoning I would be loving to apply the low third in all the tunes I use (and will continue) to play in G-maj. I don't think a low Bb would equally make sense (as opposed to the low F in the treble context).

What do you say guys? Thanks in advance for input of any kind.

Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by Wolf Molkentin
typos

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Posted (edited)

Hello Wolf,

I seem to recall, some years ago, when the topic  of  modifying  the low G# (or was it the Ab)  to  an F  , that I suggested this could cause fingering problems   when and/if  one moved to a TT, or  beyond,  keyboard.... which is why I have avoided  altering the paterns  already established  for the EC.

But if you have a bee  in your bonnet  to improve things  in your own way what can the experiences of others  be of any use  to  enquire of ?  My advice, however, is to stick to  the original layout  and  find the notes you want  where they are currently.

 

Glad  to see you  are back to the  music making,

cheers,

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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Hi Geoff,

thank you for your reply which is making me feel at home - chuckling as I too recall our controversy back then - and I can tell you now that I‘m finding the low F on the TT in fact as easily as - still - on my modified ET, so seem to be able to switch back and forth.

However, my question was rather re the choice of the particular note (in its even odder position here, providing another fifth all across the rows, thus still on the right - left - side) than the pros and cons of an alteration in general... 😊

Indeed, I badly miss the low third in Gmaj, even more as I did in Dmaj before (on the treble, where the F still seemed preferable to a F#); the root note of Bb-maj or mix (or even the minor third to G) would occur much rarer then the so EC-like G modes and their major third I reckon, at least in my playing.

What I‘m trying to achieve on the TT currently seems to play the familiar arrangements with added harmony in the „bass“ - and alternate my playing of the (E)T and the TT, with the easiest example being the adding of the low D note to complete another (lower) fifth for any D harmony.

And the suggested modification would provide bass lines like g-B-c-d or g-f#-e-d-c-B-c in the tenor register... - isn‘t this preferable to any other modification, including creating a Bb note?

Best wishes - 🐺 

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You might always feel the need  for just that extra   one  more note  at the end of the range;  perhaps you would be happier with a Baritone/treble  ?  The 64 key version  goes down to low F  , as I recall.  With one of those  you would have  the  effect of a full treble range  and the additional  octave range on the lower end.    I have the smaller  56 key version of Baritone/ Treble  and  just once  or twice  I miss  having  one or two notes at the top end of the range  but  I  really prefer it to  the Tennor /Treble.

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Posted (edited)

You definitely have a point here Geoff, and I would certainly love to try out a baritone/treble concertina - however I see „my“ TT in fact as an extension of the treble range - adding lower notes will not endlessly make that much sense insofar. Of course there is not just this single B note „missing“, but a BT would still not be preferable then I guess - inevitably heavier and larger, and thus rather a third range than the new standard for treble range with accompaniment.

Edited by Wolf Molkentin

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... and so I did it again - thereby still relying on this thread‘s useful information - so I thank you all who contributed!

Best wishes - 🐺

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(tuning holds - no readjustment required!)

and a detail in the process of soldering which might be of interest:

the (risky) heating of the reed - in order to create a firm junction between the steel and the solder - can be skipped after having the first bubble applied on the surface - you can then add solder by liquefying the bubble again and then the solder supply.

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The reed tip where solder weighting is applied / removed is the point of least bending/ most movement.  Consequently even if you lower the temper at that point, it will have negligeable effect on the reed’s “strength” compared to the added stiffness from the solder.  (also negligeable ).  For years I have been using a low melting point lead free synthetic rosin core silver bearing solder for this purpose where needed “Kester” brand, for moving into a lead free zone and it’s superior wetting power on carbon steels.  I shove a sheet of silicone rubber under the reed tip and apply the solder, then as soon as the solder freezes, I use a tissue or bit of paper towel to wipe off the still liquid flux.   I can’t remember the last time I bought tin/lead solder.  Must have been 40 years ago when the 95/5 tin antimony solders came out.  These days, there are a number of better choices.

Dana

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