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This is an old (1946 ) concertina for major overhaul. Does anyone know what make it might be. Bellow ends are marked “Silver reeds “. There is

no makers mark that I can see. 20 button ( with the majority missing ) ...Would this be something worthy of restoration?

Thanks in advance... Dale in Eastern Canada

6E53E24E-349D-4E43-98D6-02B8FD2EB883.jpeg

3E596032-BCA0-4A38-BD83-FB22C903A98A.jpeg

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What an unusual instrument.  I love those bevelled corners on the ends.  That is "unnecessary" extra work.  Add that to the 8 fold bellows, and it looks like someone put a lot of effort into making it.  Most 20 button Anglos are much simpler.  Could it have been custom made?

1946 is not old in concertina terms.  The heyday was the late 1800s and early 1900s.

I am no expert, but my gut feeling is that it was once a decent box.  I have seen ones in worse condition that have been restored.  Question is whether it would be worthwhile making new parts, individually measured, for the buttons and levers.  If all the reeds are there, it might be restorable to a good condition.

However, reasonable quality 20 button boxes are readily available around £500, so in cold economic terms, it might not be worth it.  An enthusiastic hobbyist might relish the challenge.

 

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Looks to me like a German concertina, with the wooden levers and all.

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Posted (edited)

I have seen this ad on a Canadian web-site and while it is interesting I doubt very much that it would be worth much unless someone here rocognises it and says that it has a particular rarity or collectable value.

Do you want something to put in a display cabinet or do you want a playable instrument?

If the former, and you have experience in antique repairs, then go for it - for maybe $50.  As a display piece you would not have to re-build the action,  tune the reeds or repair any bellows leaks - all of which are almost certainly issues to resolve.

If you want a playable instrument then I would avoid it like the plague.

This instrument is a long way from Eastern Ontario so you are likely buying it on the strength of those two photographs which would seem to indicate an early German made concertina, probably with a wooden action and multiple reeds on zinc plates.  More akin in construction to a miniature Bandoneon than a concertina.

 

 

Edited by Don Taylor

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2 hours ago, Jesse Smith said:

Are the reeds actually silver? What sort of tone does that lend?

More likely nickel silver, I think.

  • Like 1

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Posted (edited)

The reason I asked .....was that.....I can pick this up locally( in person)for a very reasonable amt.

What are the chances that one might be actually able to carefully dismantle and then restore? I’m in no hurry and would catalog ever move by photo. If nothing else.... I could end up with display piece....

I am told that all reeds work and are “mostly in tune”...lol

Either way.... I will have the opportunity to look at it tomorrow and decide

 

Cheers  Dale

Edited by Gadzouks

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so, where have all the buttons gone...?

please tell us upon having inspected the instrument...

Best wishes - 🐺

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Anything is possible, but it could take an awful lot of work. If your aim is to enjoy the hobby of restoring an instrument it could be a fun project; if you just want an instrument to play, there are better options out there.

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10 hours ago, Mikefule said:

More likely nickel silver, I think.

"German Silver" is copper, nickel and zinc.  No actual silver at all.

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Ultimately, a viable restoration depends on the condition of the reeds.  Replacing all the missing buttons and repairing damaged fretwork is doable, but you might end up with an instrument that is still not worth much.  I don't think it is German, unless it was marketed for the English-speaking market.

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47 minutes ago, Mike Pierceall said:

I don't think it is German, unless it was marketed for the English-speaking market.

After WWII Germany was severely restricted on what industries it could retain and what manufactured products it could export.  Musical instruments were allowed for export.  This instrument is dated as 1946 so it would fit into this period and it would be reasonable to suppose it was made in Germany for export.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allied_plans_for_German_industry_after_World_War_II

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35 minutes ago, Mike Franch said:

How does one know it was made in 1946?

It says so in the OP, plus the ad on Kijiji also says 1946.

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Posted (edited)

 

The instrument is dated  “ 1946” on the inside.

       I did have a chance to send off an inquiry on identification and restoration, along withe photos posted here,

to “Concertina Connection”. The following is the respose I just received. Needless to say I will not be getting this instrument.

Thanks to all, for your knowledge and insight. Much appreciated! 

    Cheers Dale

“It is not worth it....
It is a low end novelty concertina, (ca. $200 new). From what I see in the pics, there is at least $2400 in cost...”

William
Concertina Connection Inc.
Wakker Concertinas

Edited by Gadzouks

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