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In the beginning, we had the English concertina and the Deutsche Konzertina. When the early German Konzertina threatened to take over the low-end English market, we got the Anglo-German concertina. In the UK, the Anglo-Chromatic developed from that, while the Deutsche Konzertina grew into the bisonoric Chemnitzer, Carlsfelder and Bandoneon. England also diversified, producing various monosinoric Duet systems.

 

In short, we concertinsísts are a very diverse group, and one of our distinguishing features is the system of concertina we play. So when I joined the Cnet Forum, I chose a forum name that included my concertina system - and my nationality: "Anglo-Irishman," because I'm a native of Ireland, and I play the Anglo concertina.

Of course the term Anglo-Irish is used in other contexts. One of my favourite musical genres is the Anglo-Irish ballad - songs that are unequivocally Irish in content and sentiment, but in the English language. In a wider cultural sense, Anglo-Irish can be applied to English-speaking natives of Ireland in general. I belong to that culture by birth and upbringing.

 

So Anglo-Irishman I became on the Forum!

 

But now I may have to change that. Having been born in Northern Ireland, I have always had British citizenship, which I have retained through the forty-odd years I've lived in Germany. It doesn't stop me from being "der Ire" ("The Irishman") in our local music scene! And, as a citizen of the EU, I didn't suffer any disadvantages, except perhaps not being allowed to vote in Parliamentary elections anywhere.

 

But now, things could change. I don't know how all of you stand on the issue of Brexit - and I don't want to know - but if it does take place, I could well find myself a "foreigner" in Europe. Not even able to vote in municipal elections; not able to just nip over the border to France for a good meal, or down to Italy for a short holiday, or up to Holland to get some sea air without immigration formalities.

 

So I applied for and recently received German citizenship. With the UK still in the EU, I was able to get dual nationality, so I haven't had to give anything up.

 

But perhaps I should change my forum name to "Anglo-German-Irishman." After all, "Anglo-German" is a type of concertina, too, and my Irish repertoire will continue to be my musical mainstay.

 

History sometimes comes full circle. My very first concertina was, in fact, a German one from the then GDR, the territory of which is now part of my new home.

 

Cheers / Liebe Grüße,

John

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Posted (edited)

Guten Tag John!

 

I've been thinking along the same lines. I'm a Canadian by birth, but my paternal Grandfather emigrated from County Antrim. Because he was born in 1905 he is recognized by the Republic of Ireland as a citizen, and I am therefore eligible for an Irish passport. Would this apply to you?

Edited by Bill N

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Posted (edited)

John

 

(Way off topic, but)

 

The 'Good Friday Agreement' gives anyone born in Northern Ireland the right to Irish citizenship.

 

Ian Paisley's son even said that everyone in Northern Ireland should apply. Ian Paisley Jr! Yes, the DUP politician.

 

And as Bill points out, anyone who has at least one grand-parent born in the Republic can apply for Irish citizenship and an EU/Irish passport for about 950 euros.

 

Don.

Edited by Don Taylor

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But perhaps I should change my forum name to "Anglo-German-Irishman." After all, "Anglo-German" is a type of concertina, too, and my Irish repertoire will continue to be my musical mainstay.

 

 

How about the more catchy "Anglermishman?" ^_^

 

Seriously, I wish there was a universal passport for the world of music. Sounds somhewhat 60ish, but not everything was bad back then as far as I remember...

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Sounds somhewhat 60ish, but not everything was bad back then as far as I remember...

 

Not at all, Rüdiger! 🌞

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But perhaps I should change my forum name to "Anglo-German-Irishman." After all, "Anglo-German" is a type of concertina, too, and my Irish repertoire will continue to be my musical mainstay.

Or how do you say "Anglo-Irishman" im deutsch?

 

Then again, you could start using your actual name, and then further political changes wouldn't matter. :)

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Sounds somhewhat 60ish, but not everything was bad back then as far as I remember...

1860ish? That was a good time for the anglo. ;)

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Then again, you could start using your actual name, and then further political changes wouldn't matter. :)

That's what I've been thinking after having swapped the folkeboot for a sheepdog... B)

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How is the sheepdog to windward?

 

just fine, ears set back and all...

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But now, things could change. I don't know how all of you stand on the issue of Brexit - and I don't want to know - but if it does take place, I could well find myself a "foreigner" in Europe. Not even able to vote in municipal elections; not able to just nip over the border to France for a good meal, or down to Italy for a short holiday, or up to Holland to get some sea air without immigration formalities.

 

So I applied for and recently received German citizenship. With the UK still in the EU, I was able to get dual nationality, so I haven't had to give anything up.

 

 

Cheers / Liebe Grüße,

John

 

Like you John, after 30 odd years living in mainland Europe, I've recently found myself having to choose. As things stand, I will probably have to give up my UK passport, although there is some debate about this requirement in the Dutch parliament at the moment. Of course a lot of things could change in the next year, but it raises the thought that in future, I may possibly have to apply for a visa to visit the country of my birth! I guess at the end of the day, unlike where we decide to settle, we don't get to choose where we're born and grow up - my eldest son has passports from three countries, and has permanent residence in a fourth, so his sense of citizenship is rather wider than for many. Perhaps we should just rejoice in having been able to become economic migrants rather than refugees?

 

As to your future forum name, how about adding "Chromatic" in there somewhere!

 

Adrian

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Adrian

 

If you can you need to find a way to keep your UK citizenship and passport. The UK Home Office has been behaving very badly lately:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jan/10/nhs-nurse-denied-visa-entry-uk

 

This is not an isolated case.

 

If you have an Irish-born grandparent then you should investigate Irish citizenship which would give you an EU passport and allow you to keep your UK citizenship and passport. Plus, lobby the Dutch government to relax their rules about dual nationality.

 

Sorry to non-UK readers, but ex-pat Brits around the world will be presented with some hard choices if Brexit happens.

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