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SteveS

Nordic tunes

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Thanks to everyone who's been posting on this great thread! I played the Soundcloud recording of "Polska efter Pål Karl Persson" for my wife just now, and she noted that it's in 9/8 time ... is that a common dance form in Sweden?

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Thanks to everyone who's been posting on this great thread! I played the Soundcloud recording of "Polska efter Pål Karl Persson" for my wife just now, and she noted that it's in 9/8 time ... is that a common dance form in Sweden?

What we were playing is a polska. Commonly written as 3/4 - but this is only an approximation. The swing comes from knowing the genre. In the case of polskas, the 2nd beat is stretched to a varying degree (dependent on the type of polska), and the 1st and/or 3rd beats can be stretched or shortened (again dependent of the type of polska). So although it may sound like 9/8, it's just the way the tune distils out taking the aforementioned into account, and the traditions from which the tune comes.

Edited by SteveS

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Guest Zorro

What necessary words... super, remarkable idea

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I was suggested a Swedish (I think) tune this week, which turned out to be great fun (currently learning it on the melodeon). I suspect it might port quite nicely to the concertina too: Eklunda Polska No. 3.

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I was suggested a Swedish (I think) tune this week, which turned out to be great fun (currently learning it on the melodeon). I suspect it might port quite nicely to the concertina too: Eklunda Polska No. 3.

 

An old favorite tune in Sweden, and for good reason.

 

It fits nicely (n the key of G) on just about any standard concertina... or any instrument that can play melody, for that matter. (Trombone, anyone? ;)) I just tried it out on an English (my main squeeze), a tin whistle, Crane duet, Maccann duet, and C/G anglo. On the anglo I tried it in G and also in C, since the latter would simulate playing in G on a G/D, and that worked nicely in two different octaves. Fell easily under my fingers on all of them, even the Maccann, which I've hardly touched in many years. Adding harmonies or chords should be easy enough for those used to doing so.

 

The nyckelharpa is very interesting. I've never before seen one played in fiddle position.

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I was suggested a Swedish (I think) tune this week, which turned out to be great fun (currently learning it on the melodeon). I suspect it might port quite nicely to the concertina too: Eklunda Polska No. 3.

 

An old favorite tune in Sweden, and for good reason.

 

It fits nicely (n the key of G) on just about any standard concertina... or any instrument that can play melody, for that matter. (Trombone, anyone? ;)) I just tried it out on an English (my main squeeze), a tin whistle, Crane duet, Maccann duet, and C/G anglo. On the anglo I tried it in G and also in C, since the latter would simulate playing in G on a G/D, and that worked nicely in two different octaves. Fell easily under my fingers on all of them, even the Maccann, which I've hardly touched in many years. Adding harmonies or chords should be easy enough for those used to doing so.

 

The nyckelharpa is very interesting. I've never before seen one played in fiddle position.

 

 

 

We play the Eklunda Polska No 3, regularly at a monthly London Scandi session I go to. It's a nice tune, and as you say, it fits nicely (in the key of G) on just about any standard concertina. And as for the Nyckelharpa being played in the fiddle position, as in the video, while the standard position most harpa players hold it in, is across their laps, more or less horizontally, like a hurdy gurdy is played, there are a few different ways some harpa players experiment with holding their instruments because they hope to find it more comfortable than the 'standard' position. Sometimes, taller people and people with longer arms, find holding their harpa across the chest in a fiddle-like position, is more comfortable that way. There are two harpa players, both women who are slightly taller than average for a women, who come to the Scandi session and hold their harpas this way. What ever works best for you, I guess.

 

Chris

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I was suggested a Swedish (I think) tune this week, which turned out to be great fun (currently learning it on the melodeon). I suspect it might port quite nicely to the concertina too: Eklunda Polska No. 3.

 

Very inspiring, thanks for posting! :)

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Here's a tune that I've been working on over the last few days - Enkronaspolskan e Omas Per from Transtrand, Western Dalarna, Sweden.

 

A bit rough around the edges, but coming along.

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It's been some time since my last tune upload.

 

Here's a polska from the parish of Ore in Dalarna - G-moll Polskan

 

The dance is orepolska.

Edited by SteveS

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It's been ages since my last posting on this thread.  I've been busy learning loads of new tunes - I intend to post more over the coming weeks.

Here's an alterrnative version of Enkronaspolskan - this one after the playing of Ole Bäckström - I prefer this verion of the tune.

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