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swing music on concertina

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Here is my rather hesitant attempt at playing chatanooga choo choo

 

I may re-record later....definitely had my fingers hopping around.

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you can comment I won't bite....

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Makes me want to take a crack at it myself, but I've had trouble rustling up anything to use as a lead sheet.

 

Where did you get your notes? (I presume you went by notes)

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Here is my rather hesitant attempt at playing chatanooga choo choo

 

I may re-record later....definitely had my fingers hopping around.

Great. Deffo one to promote at Swaledale Squeeze. Will try to get Harry Scurfield and Mike Wild to ramp it up during the late night sessions, with jazz harmonicas thrown in. :)

What key were you in?

 

Ransom - yup, only copyright owners selling it as far as I can see too.

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Yep. I used a book with the dots in...although didn't play all that were written. lol!

Its in well there was no sharps in the key sig so I'm guessing C?

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Yep. I used a book with the dots in...although didn't play all that were written. lol!

Its in well there was no sharps in the key sig so I'm guessing C?

ta.

Groundbreaking interpretations never stick slavishly to the original composers notation so you should loose or add a few notes anyway!

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Great stuff Sarah. What about working in a couple of chords at the end of each line as a next stage; just under the held note at the end of the phrase so not when anything else is going on. 'Pardon me boy' chord chord, 'is that the Chatanooga choochoo' chord chord. That's probably all you need to call it finished.

 

Did the people who wrote the words to this sort of stuff have any self respect do you think? Good tune, well worth a go but the words...

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Great stuff Sarah. What about working in a couple of chords at the end of each line as a next stage; just under the held note at the end of the phrase so not when anything else is going on. 'Pardon me boy' chord chord, 'is that the Chatanooga choochoo' chord chord. That's probably all you need to call it finished.

 

Did the people who wrote the words to this sort of stuff have any self respect do you think? Good tune, well worth a go but the words...

 

Hope to add some accompaniment eventually. That was only a quick recording after a few hours of practice in the afternoon (the silly thunder drowned out my playing so I gave up after a while). But hoping to get back to it again.

 

 

 

 

I quite like the words. lol! Like choo choo cha'boogie too.

 

 

 

 

It sounds better than my attempt at 'in the mood' on fiddle. :P

 

 

 

 

I've been learning lindy hop over past few months...hence my sudden penchant for swing music.

 

 

 

 

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Nice! I agree with Dirge, just a little chordal accompaniment in the right places and she'll be ready for the hop.

I would love to work up an arrangement of Glen Miller's "In the Mood".

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Swing music is a lot of fun. I'm working on In The Mood, partly as an excercise to get my left hand speed up. The arrangement I'm using has g-b-d accented in the main repeat, so that gets the left hand going on EC. The arrangement was done for organ, but calls for Color: REED ensemble, so it seems to work for EC. It has chording accents, which I think will work - but I haven't got that far yet.

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ApprenticeOF, I am assuming the score is written in G? That sounds very interesting. I would love to hear it when you get it 'down'. I think in a song like 'In the Mood' the dynamics and accents will be everything. It is such a fun song to listen too it will be great to play.

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Now you're exposing my musical ignorance - haven't a clue what key the score is written in. I'm one of those folks who always wanted to play an instrument, but couldn't really get anywhere until I picked up the EC. In fact, I couldn't even read music. Now if I could just find a store that sells things like rythym, Oh, and maybe talent...

 

I have another arrangement of In The Mood that I tried, but it didn't seem to suit the EC as well - it uses d-f#-a for the same phrase. It lacks the introduction, but does have lyrics - which is interesting as I never associated lyrics with the tune.

 

Doug

Edited by apprenticeOF

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Nice! I agree with Dirge, just a little chordal accompaniment in the right places and she'll be ready for the hop.

I would love to work up an arrangement of Glen Miller's "In the Mood".

 

In the mood is in the tunebook too. I can do that but it sounds very repetitive without a full band to it. lol

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LDT

 

You inspired me. I found the tune on "musicnotes". My Dad had his own BIG BAND. I grew up listen to this great swing music for years. Now I know why children who listen to Irish traditional tunes can play so well. Once I had the notes in front of me the tune just spilled out. I did change the key to D, my husband recognized it immediately in that key. (he should know he was a young teen when this song was originally popular). Thanks again for posting, it has open up a whole new side for me. To play for the sure fun of it. If I can figure out how to post using my I pad and music cloud as you did maybe I will send you a version.

 

Lorie :D

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LDT

 

You inspired me. I found the tune on "musicnotes". My Dad had his own BIG BAND. I grew up listen to this great swing music for years. Now I know why children who listen to Irish traditional tunes can play so well. Once I had the notes in front of me the tune just spilled out. I did change the key to D, my husband recognized it immediately in that key. (he should know he was a young teen when this song was originally popular). Thanks again for posting, it has open up a whole new side for me. To play for the sure fun of it. If I can figure out how to post using my I pad and music cloud as you did maybe I will send you a version.

 

Lorie :D

 

That's cool. Yeah I'm starting to feel confident enough to have a go play stuff I want to play rather than sticking exclusively to one genre.

 

 

It would be easier to play on melodeon in D.

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Nice choice! Have you got a C/G Anglo? The tune does seem to be centred around key of C. I just messed around and your recording seemed to start on -push e on the RHS , so it went e f f# g so not standard C scale from the start!

It would be a nice one to get a discussion going on what chords and keys are involved. I found it went a bit high towards the end , I'm playing it from memory and trying to sing the words too

 

I'm sure Alan Day and Will Fly, Jody Kruskal, Bertram Levy , Dirge and Brian Peters who are on c net could advise. I find the modulations in these tunes very interesting and challenging. Harry Scurfield may come on c, net I don't know that I've ever seen him on or John Kirkpatrick either

who would know just what to do I'm sure

I will work on it!:) At the moment my head tells me to play it in key of G. B c c# d

 

 

What I do is try the 3rd note in the appropriate key then hunt and peck and see if the tune goes and my voice fits it. The chords come a lot later after messing about with octaves and two note chords etc on the LHS.,

Edited by michael sam wild

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Well the notation has key sig with no sharps or flats, but there's a couple of 'accidental' sharps and flats in the tune.

 

 

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30 secs of fiddling on the internet AND....

 

Chattanooga Choo Choo

recorded by Hank Snow

written by Mack Gordon & Harry Warren

 

C G7 F C

Pardon me boy is this the Chattanooga Choo Choo

G7 D7 C

Track twenty nine boy you can give me a shine

G7 F C

I can afford to board the Chattanooga Choo Choo

D7 Am D7 C

I've got my fare and just a trifle to spare

 

F C7 F

You leave the Pennsylvania Station bout a quarter to four

C7 F C7

Read a magazine and then you're in Baltimore

A# G7 F A#

Dinner in the diner nothing could be finer

G7 Dm C7

Than to have your ham and eggs in Carolina

 

F C7 F C7

When you hear the whistle blowing eight to the bar

F C7 F C7

Then you know that Tennessee is not very far

F G7 F D7

Shovel all the coal in gotta keep a rolling

C7 F

Woo woo Chattanooga there you are

 

C C7 F C

There's gonna be a certain party at the station

D7 G7 C

Satin and lace I used to call funny face

C7 F

She's gonna cry until I tell her that I'll never roam

C Am F G7 C

So Chattanooga choo choo won't you choo-choo me home

 

Am F G7 C

Chattanooga choo choo won't you choo-choo me home

 

 

 

Doesn't look too frightening. You did say C didn't you?

 

Editted to add that as pasted into the reply box the chords are spaced over the lines at the correct point to play them. As displayed the chords all get scrunched up on the left so you'll need to work out where to change. Sorry; dunno what that's about.

Edited by Dirge

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