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frances

Does anyone know this maker?

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Hello

 

Can anyone provide any clues about a concertina maker called Richard Cook & Co? I have a 48 button concertina in its box which has a label saying the maker is Richard Cook & Co of 133 Fenchurch Street, London. Just in case anyone does know anything about this firm, there is also a serial number; 13,180.

 

The instrument seems (to my entirely inexpert eye) to be intact, though some of the buttons are definitely stuck down or sticky, and there is scuffing and wear on the sides.

 

It looks very similar in style to this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/270896325288?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2648

 

I do appreciate, of course, that the picture is of an instrument by a very well renowned maker, I am simply using it as a reference for the design of the concertina and box I have!

 

If anyone has any knowledge that could help us decide whether, for example, it is worth having repaired, that would be great!

 

Many thanks in advance :)

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Possibly a retailer who re-badged concertinas built by others. This seems to have been a fairly common practice, the ones I've seen being Lachenals with labels by Metzler and by Dawkins.

 

Pictures of your concertina will help regarding whether or not is worth repairing.

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Thank you - here are some pics... I've tried to show all angles, I hope they are clear enough. If there are any other shots that would be helpful, I'll try and take them!

post-9837-0-25475700-1327671782_thumb.jpgpost-9837-0-04682100-1327671797_thumb.jpgpost-9837-0-35369000-1327671766_thumb.jpgpost-9837-0-29806100-1327671920_thumb.jpgpost-9837-0-07269800-1327671896_thumb.jpgpost-9837-0-84605300-1327671885_thumb.jpg

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It looks like a very typical Lachenal, or Wheatstone from the era when L Lachenal worked for Wheatstone. If you open it up you should find the makers name on the paper labels on the reed pans.

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It looks like a very typical Lachenal, or Wheatstone from the era when L Lachenal worked for Wheatstone. If you open it up you should find the makers name on the paper labels on the reed pans.

 

Thank you for this - is there anything I need to be particularly careful about in opening it? Something I've not attempted before!

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Make sure your screwdriver is a good fit in the enbolts, and is not worn. Make sure all 6 bolts are out before attempting to lift of the ends. You don't need to unfasten anything else to get to the reed pans.

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It looks like a very typical Lachenal, or Wheatstone from the era when L Lachenal worked for Wheatstone. If you open it up you should find the makers name on the paper labels on the reed pans.

 

Thank you for this - is there anything I need to be particularly careful about in opening it? Something I've not attempted before!

 

After you undo the 6 end bolts, leave them in and lift off the end with the bolts in place, makes it easier to put the end back so that the each bolt goes back in the hole it came from.

If you only take one end off at a time you can see which way round to put it back! (There are usually markings that you can align with, but to start with this makes it simpler not to get confused :-) )

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A browse through the pictures indicates that this concertina may have been worked on in the past. It's not the very basic model as it has bushed keys. I note that the key bushings are red, which indicates that this instrument has been cared for in the past (originals are black felt in my limited experience). The bellows look decent, but hard to tell as sometimes ones that look good in a picture crumble when flexed.

 

Especially if it has steel reed tongues (they will be in brass frames) this will be a pretty decent instrument (assuming the reeds are in as good condition as the exterior indicates). I have a Lachenal (much later serial number) that looks very similar and is quite enjoyable to play.

 

If you want to play it, it will likely be worthwhile having it repaired.

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When you unscrew the end bolts, don't unscrew them in 1-2-3 order but by opposites, like with a car tire. Tighten them the same way.

 

Be sure to put the bolts in the same hole they came out of. If you can leave them in the end, that works, but if you need to take them out, keep them in exact order. Some people use an upended paper or Styrofoam cup. I've always been successful doing this, except once--I had a disaster, the bolts spilled, and then putting them back became a disaster.

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Can anyone provide any clues about a concertina maker called Richard Cook & Co? ....the maker is Richard Cook & Co of 133 Fenchurch Street, London.

In the 1869 PO street directory Richard Cook & Co are listed as a pianoforte maker. No listing in the Trade Directory for 1856, but same address in the 1865 one. Still there in 1882, but gone by 1891.

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