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Pete Dunk

A Rising Star?

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I'm waiting for the first video of you playing. ;) :P

You'll be playing on more keys by the end of the week I suspect with that kinda rapid progress.

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Nice one Derek and welcome here. After melodeon you will be amazed at what is possible on the Anglo C/G. Anglo International, 3 CDs gives a great taste.

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The worlds gone topsy turvey. You've taken up concertina and I've got myself a violin.:blink:

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Hi Derek. Nice video, you are doing well with the 'concertina mouth' already.

 

I note you play in key of C along the middle row. That comes naturally to a mouthorgan or melodeon player. a lot of'English' payers use a G/D concertina but I think it's better to stick to C/G for the wide range of styles possible, but I have both for that bouncy diatonic feel when I want it. William Kimber played in C a lot because that was what was avilable in his day on C/G 2 row.

 

 

To get tunes in G to play in sessions etc you will find that G on the G row is quite high pitched and you will then start wanting to cross the rows like John Kirkpatrick and Brian Peters et al. That will also open up Irish tunes if you want to play them.

 

 

D is another nice challenge and you need the accidental RHS c# a lot.

 

40 buttons was a good choice as you will have alterabntive push or pull for the same note when using LHS chords. That's when it gets different from 'simpler' melodeon style playing.

 

 

I came from mouthorgan and melodeon after many years and like you got a tune quite quickly (in my case it was a Bb /F I borrowed so couldn't play along with anybodycool.gif . I think if I'd got a G/D I'd be still playing oompah like I did on melodeon. It's been a 5 year journey of discovery and I'm still finding it challenging! Could you work on Nutting Girl in G?. I'd ony use notes 1 and 5 in the chords to begin ( like taking out the 3rd with the button on the LHS of some melodeons)

 

 

Youll find that you use the G pull on the accidental row quite a bit for smooth playing.

 

 

 

Dan Worrall's book on the anglo has some very good stuff on how early players played in octaves in C going between the rows. They found the transition to playing in G and D with fiddle and flute players challenging too.

 

 

Anyway have fun that's the main thing and with your melodeon skills and playing by ear you'll have hold of it pretty quick I'm sure.

 

I found this site and its members very helpful and a lot of stuff has been covered in the past so use the search facility.

Edited by michael sam wild

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Where did the instrument come from and what is it?

 

It's only a wild guess but it may be this concertina. In any event it's a 40 button metal ended Wheatstone C/G.

Despite Derek's Ben protestation it is this one (missing half the buttons, German metal ended with sharp edges to make the finger's bleed) making his playing even more amazing - why bother with 48 buttons when 13 will do?!!! :)

 

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Hi Derek. Nice video, you are doing well with the 'concertina mouth' already.

I note you play in key of C along the middle row. That comes naturally to a mouthorgan or melodeon player. a lot of'English' payers use a G/D concertina but I think it's better to stick to C/G for the wide range of styles possible, but I have both for that bouncy diatonic feel when I want it. William Kimber played in C a lot because that was what was avilable in his day on C/G 2 row.

To get tunes in G to play in sessions etc you will find that G on the G row is quite high pitched and you will then start wanting to cross the rows like John Kirkpatrick and Brian Peters et al. That will also open up Irish tunes if you want to play them.

D is another nice challenge and you need the accidental RHS c# a lot.

40 buttons was a good choice as you will have alterabntive push or pull for the same note when using LHS chords. That's when it gets different from 'simpler' melodeon style playing.

I came from mouthorgan and melodeon after many years and like you got a tune quite quickly (in my case it was a Bb /F I borrowed so couldn't play along with anybodycool.gif . I think if I'd got a G/D I'd be still playing oompah like I did on melodeon. It's been a 5 year journey of discovery and I'm still finding it challenging! Could you work on Nutting Girl in G?. I'd ony use notes 1 and 5 in the chords to begin ( like taking out the 3rd with the button on the LHS of some melodeons)

Youll find that you use the G pull on the accidental row quite a bit for smooth playing.

Dan Worrall's book on the anglo has some very good stuff on how early players played in octaves in C going between the rows. They found the transition to playing in G and D with fiddle and flute players challenging too.

Anyway have fun that's the main thing and with your melodeon skills and playing by ear you'll have hold of it pretty quick I'm sure.

 

I found this site and its members very helpful and a lot of stuff has been covered in the past so use the search facility.

 

Thanks for this brilliant advice , i really appreciate it ... I tryed messing around in the key of D today and also an Irish style tune to try new things (struggle) spent ages reading all ovedr this forum for playing advice and cross row structures of playing such as the Noel Hill fingering ... didn't really find it though.

So yes the plan is to develop all styles and all keys in the future and get the most out of the little beastie!

So C/G was deliberate!

 

Thanks Derek B)

Edited by DerekTheNutter

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I found C tunes and chords good for solo playing and singing but soon realised the need to mave on from what I call Kimber Kords, much as I love his playing . Alan Day's tutorials, John Kirkpatrick's notes were helpful as were Peter Trimming's YouTube videos. Bertram Levy's book and CD were good for playing in C.

 

 

For playing in G and D I rate Mick Bramich's book and rcordings as excellent ( from Mally Music) and John Williams DVD and Frank Edgely's CDs and Book and DVD.

 

 

I don't think there is yet a comprehensive book , DVD etc on the C/G Anglo until Noel Hill, John KP and Brian Peters and Harry Scurfield do theirs!rolleyes.gif

 

Jody Kruskal has some great instructional material on his approach and I'd like to see a DVD and a book.

 

 

It can all get quite confusing when you read the dscussions on these forums so I reckon work on tunes in various keys with varying available notes in different directions.

 

Some people think chords first then fit the tunes, others do tune first, I now do a combination to get the best pull or push.

 

It keeps evolving

Edited by michael sam wild

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